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7 Well-Designed Landing Page Examples

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Well designed landing pages are no easy feat, but much easier to make happen and do well than 10-years ago. With a whole host of tools and content for landing pages at your disposal, developing one for your business has never been easier. 

Before you dive into your first landing page, we recommend doing your research and learning the process of how to write, build, and test landing pages.  Despite the easy accessibility to tools for building landing pages, it is still possible to build a bad landing page. 

In light of this, here are 7 of the best-designed landing page examples for you to hone your skills on. 

1. HelloFresh 

hello fresh

Ever had a HelloFresh box show up out of the blue with really no recollection of how it could possibly have your name on it or be at your front door? 

That’s because their landing pages are so dang cute from a design perspective and genius from a landing page strategy, that you barely realized you had signed up for more than one delivery. 

We’re not saying that HelloFresh tricks people or anything – we’re all aware of what we’ve done, but the landing page process can be so seamless and the offer can be so good that it’s hard to realize what you’ve done. 

That is until you’re standing there with a sack full of new groceries on a Monday staring dumbfounded at the HelloFresh box at your doorstep because you totally forgot it was HelloFresh week and you actually didn’t need to buy groceries. 

That’s the power of a well-designed landing page. 

2. Winc Wine Club

Winc Wine Club

 

Similar to HelloFresh, ever had a box of wine show up at your house that you totally forgot about because again, signing up was so easy that you barely realized what you were doing until you did it, then forgot about it, then found it delivered at your house? 

That’s the power of a well-designed landing page – all the elements come together that it doesn’t even feel like shopping anymore – it feels like… well magic! 

3. Yeti Coolers

Yeti Coolers

Then there are landing pages that are just seriously thought-through, beautifully crafted eCommerce collection pages in disguise. 

Take this Yeti Collection page for their Tundra Yeti Coolers for example. The difference between this one and every single other product collection page you’ve ever seen is that lifestyle image right smack in the middle of the page. 

Set there on the page like that to give you some perspective on what one of Yeti’s coolers looks like out in the wild. As you can see, it looks pretty god damn tough – like their messaging points out. 

And right there on that page, you get why there’s thousands of reviews for what you might have thought was an overpriced insulated box. 

That’s the power of a well-designed landing page. 

4. Monday.com

Monday

Great copy, perfectly styled creative, and well placed CTA can go a long way! 

But not as far as it can go when it’s positioned perfectly between a conversion and an aligning search ad. I triggered this landing page off of searching for “Scrum Board Software.” 

Knowing that my intent was based on managing team tasks, Monday.com came to my rescue and made me feel like they had just the solution I needed for my search. 

That’s the power of a well-designed landing page. 

5. Zapier

Zapier

The reason all of these landing pages are so impressive is partly due to the fact that they are all built around search ads triggered by specific phrases. 

When done right, search advertising paired with a supporting landing page that is dialed to the query is the perfect example of an optimized customer journey.

What I love about this hero copy is that it provides the user with three CTAs:

  • The demo is a bit less aggressive than the trial
  • The trial still being front and center
  • And then that bold small offer looking for the 0.01% who are also looking for an offer to pull the trigger on. 

That’s the power of a well-designed landing page. 

6. Allbirds 

Allbirds

Other times, you end up somewhere you didn’t really intend to be. 

You were searching running shoes and thinking you would end up with some Adidas or Nike ads, instead you get an allbirds ad and think, “allbirds? Is making performance running shoes now? I should probably check this out – just for fun of course.” 

And you get there and it’s as if allbirds is saying, “Hell yeah we’re making running shoes, come check them out, you won’t be disappointed!” 

And you’re so drawn in by the hero video of people running on the beach in what you guess are allbirds, that you have to keep scrolling, and then all of the sudden… you have allbirds on the way to your apartment. 

That’s the power of well-designed landing pages. 

7. Shopify

Shopify

And then there are those familiar ones – the ones you use every day, the Shopifys of the world. 

You run a search just to see if there’s anything else out there. 

A dumb search like, “Sell goods.” You think,  maybe… something… anything else has come up that might dwarf Shopify in comparison. 

First, search result, it’s Shopify. Well of course it’s shopify, you think. You click it – what the hell? 

You don’t need to be sold on Shopify, but you see the landing page and know you’re still in good hands. 

That’s the power of a well-designed landing page. 

Sketching website landing pages.

How To Write, Build, and Test Landing Pages

Sketching website landing pages.

Like a strategic blog post series or email marketing drip campaign, landing pages should be a part of any startup, eCommerce, or enterprise business’ online marketing toolkit.

From creation to testing, tweaking, and more testing, this conversion rate optimization process can help to increase conversion rates when done correctly.

Too many founders and marketers create landing web pages and forget about them. Even more frequently, marketers do one or two tests only to move onto another marketing initiative because they feel that they’ve learned all they can from their website visitors.

Think of your landing pages as a dynamic process. You should be able to learn from them on a recurring basis and leverage your winning results. Even after you’ve found scalable results, the landing page process will allow you to test those positive results and optimize further.

You can use your landing pages to qualify leads, test lead generation concepts with potential customers, and, of course, increase conversions. To do all of this and more, you’ll need a process.

Here’s the complete Tuff guide to help you write, build, and test landing pages.

Step 1: Landing Page Design Structure  

Landing page strategy sketch.

Before you start writing copy or considering your image assets, it’s incredibly important that you design a landing page structure that is the right fit for your industry and audience.

Depending on if you sell a product or a service, your landing page structure will be different. For eCommerce product companies your landing page might feature an offer discount for your product and for startup tech or Enterprise SaaS your landing page might be collecting email addresses through an email signup form field.

Figuring out the basic building blocks of your landing page is the first part in landing page design. When you have that plan, then you are ready to begin your design layout.

A great way to layout your design is through a process known as wireframing.

Wireframes are a blueprint to define the information architecture and layout of your landing page.

For each landing page, you create, you should have multiple versions, but you’ll want the structure of the landing page to be the same across all the landing page versions. Being disciplined with this part of the process will allow you to learn faster during the test phase.

Step 2: Write The Landing Page Copy

Writing copy for a landing page.

Now that you have the structure of your landing page design you can begin the process of writing your landing page copy. For each section of your wireframe, you will want to create a landing page with 5 different versions of the copy for you to use during the revision and testing stages.

For example, all landing pages have a headline, description, and call to action. For each copy component of the landing page, you will want to write 5 different versions – 5x headlines, 5x descriptions, and 5 calls to action.

Remember that your copy should be human, original, and succinct.

With a landing page, you’re focusing your user’s attention down to one goal – to take the call to action (email signup, demo booking, purchase with an offer).

The call to action should be clear and concise, the user should have no problem understanding what you want them to do and what they get in return using the copy you have provided.

Step 3: Build 5 Landing Pages and Add Images

By step 3, you should have your landing page section structured with 5 sets of copy assigned to each section. The next step is to build 5 landing pages with the sets of the copy.

We recommend using a tool to help facilitate your build. This process should be pretty straightforward since you have already done the planning.

If you have a habit of making changes in the middle of a process, don’t. If you can’t help yourself, then have someone else on your team put the landing pages together using the building blocks you already designed and defined.

Now is not the time for you to try to guess what will resonate with your audience – we’ll get to that in the next step.

Once you have your five versions of your landing pages built, then you’re going to pick two of them to use in your first round of tests. We recommend getting feedback from your internal team on what they think will be the most effective two versions to test against each other.

Remember the structure and goals of the two landing pages should be the same, the only variables that should be different are the copy and creative.

Step 4: Landing Page Testing

Woman biting pencil.

To effectively drive traffic quickly and learn efficiently which landing page converts best, you will create a test campaign with two ad sets that contain the same budget.

Each of the ad sets will contain identical ads to the other ad set, the only difference will be the destination that you send the audience to in each ad.

For example ad A will direct to landing page v.1 and ad B will go to landing page v.2.

Run each ad for the same duration.

After the ads have completed their tests, then measure which one is the winner. You can do this by measuring your lead generation results or overall conversions.

You now have a baseline to build new tests off of to optimize your landing page, but you’re far from done. The only real result that you have is that you know that the winning landing page performs better than the loser.

Next, you will need to put your land page winner up against an even better competitor to learn and optimize.

Step 5: Optimizing Landing Pages 

You will need to set up a new test where all the variables are the same except for one. Maybe you’ll choose to test a new headline or call to action in your second test.

To do a new headline, you would take your winning landing page and duplicate it, then change the headline to the new copy. You would then test the winning landing page from your first test against the new iteration.

For each new variable you test, you’ll need to do a new test. Once you have tested all the variables from your baseline winner then you should test against a new structure.

Finding a new structure will require you to repeat steps 1 – 4 to create a new landing page with a new structure and test it against your winning landing page from round 1.

To be successful at the landing page process you need to be disciplined at following the steps. Skipping them or combining too many tests at once within the process will result in a lack of understanding of what is driving positive results.

tuff-landing-page-or-homepage

Home Page or Landing Page? Where To Send Your Paid Traffic

Think your homepage is good enough to send paid traffic to? Think again.

First of all, what is the difference between a homepage and a landing page?

A homepage is the central focus of your website

It’s used as the front-facing asset for the various forms of traffic coming to your business.  

A homepage is meant to:

  • Clearly align with your audience and their needs
  • Be easy to navigate to other areas of your site
  • Make it obvious how to convert into a lead or take next steps to engage further with your company
  • Be clear and comprehensive about what you do
  • Leave a good impression about your brand and what it stands for

A homepage is important because a lot of the disparate traffic across the web will somehow be pointed to your homepage, including SEO backlinks which are generally pointed towards homepages.

If you’re doing a lot of networking or emailing you could also see a lot of direct traffic typing in your name and going straight to your homepage. In general, more than 50% of your website traffic will go to your homepage.

A lot of companies take great pains to make sure their homepage is optimized to convert. This amount of effort on the homepage can sometimes lead a marketing manager or decision maker to favor the homepage for paid traffic rather than a landing page. The thinking is usually that if you’ve put in the effort to raise conversion rates on the homepage, it should be a strong enough to capture paid traffic as well.

So, in comparison, what is a landing page?  

A landing page is a narrow-focused page. It’s designed to align even more closely with a specific need your audience has. According to Neil Patel, a landing page is developed with One reader in mind, for One big idea.  

A landing page is meant to:

  • Have 100% Ad -> Page consistency with messaging (i.e. your paid ad is about an upcoming webinar and your landing page is all about that specific webinar topic with a form to fill out to save your seat)
  • Leave the audience with one option of what to do next, usually in line with their specific pain point (i.e. you send paid traffic looking for the Keyword ‘Promo Product Samples’ to a page where they can get samples of your Product, not the homepage where they can get samples, mock ups, catalogs, and join the mailing list)
  • Be the solution they’re looking for (i.e. someone is looking for Apple Macbook Pro and you send them to a page all about the Macbook Pro, rather than sending them to a page with various apple products to choose from)
  • Follow the best practices for a homepage like leaving a good brand impression and being easy to convert

A landing page by its customizable nature is a better choice for (increasingly expensive) paid traffic because it aligns more closely with the customer journey. In fact, companies that test their homepage versus landing pages have seen big increases in conversions, up to a 55% lift

The reason is that a landing page speaks directly to a user’s need, which you should have already hyper-focused using your ad targeting and ad copy. By the time the customer gets to your page they should be relieved to have found exactly what they’re looking for.

Homepage vs. landing page

When deciding on sending paid traffic to a homepage versus a landing page, think of the customer and where they’re at in their journey. 

If they are showing any kind of buying intent or product/service specificity within their paid search, think about catering to that with a landing page. Another case for a landing page would be remarketing specific products (Macbook Pro) to specific segments of audience (cart abandoners) that showed interest in that product.  

But my homepage is still good enough, it converts well!

If your traffic is very top of funnel and searching for more vague terms, or if the searcher is simply searching for brand terms, you could get away with a great homepage. Another case for the homepage is remarketing to that top of funnel traffic, the people that aren’t as familiar with your brand.

As always with marketing, think of the customer first and where they are in their journey. Then, test using a landing page versus a homepage, catering your funnel to the user’s needs, and watch your conversions skyrocket.

 

We’d love to work with you.

Schedule a call with our team and we’ll analyze your marketing, product, metrics, and business. Then, present a Growth Plan with actionable strategies to find and keep more engaged customers.

tuff-increase-landing-page-conversion-rate

How Wireframing Will Improve Your Landing Page Conversion Rate

We sometimes get questions about how other clients work with Tuff to reach their growth goals — so we’re sharing some stories to help bring our services to life. Meet Xendoo.

Xendoo is an online accounting and bookkeeping service partnering with small business owners to take on their business financials and accounting with a dedicated team of CPAs. They give small business owners time back to focus on their business and give them peace of mind by knowing their books are being done correctly. Founded in 2016, Xendoo received an initial round of funding in 2017. We were lucky to start working with them later that year.

“Not only are they a true pleasure to work with, they achieve phenomenal results. Highly recommend the team to people that are committed to growing their business. When you hire TUFF, prepare to hang on for a great ride.” – Lil Robets, CEO, Xendoo (View our reviews on Google & Facebook)

We partnered with Xendoo to improve their landing page conversion rate and as a result, they had their highest client acquisition month ever with:

  • 35% increase in conversions MoM
  • 82% Increase in new clients MoM

Why Xendoo Focused On User Experience

A website is one of the most powerful user acquisition channels for businesses today, and for good reason. If you build it right, your website can be the best and most cost-effective marketing tool you have. Especially when you’ve done the research to know which complimentary user acquisition channels are going to drive the most growth for your audience.

For a fast-growing startup, it’s common to outgrow the early versions of your site. As you scale, your positioning will evolve, your brand identity will become more established, and you’ll hone in on your ideal users.

As this happens, it’s critical that your site also evolves. If you put consistent effort into improving the user experience of your website and everything that goes with it, you can consistently improve your conversion rate and scale your user acquisition.

Xendoo launched their site in late 2017 with two core goals in mind: client acquisition and fundraising. The site needed to serve and secure new clients, but it also needed to attract investors. We launched our paid client acquisition efforts in January of 2018 and immediately started growing a slow, but steady, client base. As Xendoo gained more traction throughout the year, the site data started pouring in and areas of improvement were easily identified.

So, how did we double their conversions (yes, that turned into almost twice as many clients per month!)?

Let’s dive in and take a look.

Xendoo’s Playbook

Customer Research

Designing a great user experience requires understanding the problems different visitors have and then working to solve those problems. Before we worked on the structure of the website, we leveraged Google Analytics, LiveHelpNow (live chat), and CallRail (phone calls) to identify hurdles that stopped people from moving through the conversion funnel.

Three distinct themes surfaced:

What services does Xendoo offer exactly?
Ideal: When someone lands on this page, they should immediately know how it’s going to help them.

What services do you integrate with?
Ideal: This should be quick and easy to understand.

How do I start a free trial?
Ideal: Consistent language and visuals around one primary CTA.

Clear CTA

Leaning on the data we turned our focus to the site structure, designing the primary CTA first. Making the CTA the first element you include in your skeleton layout will ensure that the rest of the website supports the CTA and isn’t buried on the page. When working on user flow, you need to ask yourself “What is the number one thing we want users to do?” and “What value does our service or product fulfill for the user?” The intersection of these answers is your primary call-to-action. For Xendoo, this CTA was a month of bookkeeping for free.

Wireframes

Once we had the CTA’s identified, we built the site wireframes. Wireframes are a blueprint to define the information architecture and layout of your website or product. They allow you to take a step back from the design and develop a clear understanding of all user paths throughout a site. This is one of the most essential, yet overlooked, steps in creating a high-converting website.

Mock Up

The final step in the wireframe process was to develop a sample mock. It’s a common practice for designers to use “Lorem Ipsum” while wireframing and designing mockups. But, when it comes to increasing your conversions your content is equally, if not more important, as your layout and design. Once we had the copy down, we were able to work it into an illustrative mock that set the tone for the entirety of the site design.

Results:

  • Best client acquisition month ever!
  • 35% increase in conversions MoM
  • 82% Increase in new clients MoM

We’d love to work with you.

Schedule a call with our team and we’ll analyze your marketing, product, metrics, and business. Then, present a Growth Plan with actionable strategies to find and keep more engaged customers.