Tag Archive for: landing page

writing copy for a landing page

How To Write Landing Pages That Turn Traffic Into Paying Customers

writing copy for a landing page

When working with a growth marketing agency like Tuff, you can expect that we’ll tackle all kinds of growth marketing strategies, from CRO and SEO to Social Media Ads and PPC.

But none of those strategies can happen without the help of the simple landing page!

Whether it’s using one to collect email addresses, encourage downloads, make an order, or set up a demo, landing pages are an essential building block to every marketing funnel.

And while there is no perfect formula to writing landing page copy that converts, I’m going to share some of the key elements required to write landing page copy that will make your Stripe account sing. 

Let’s dive in!

1. Know your audience.

It’s one of the basic tenets of marketing: know your audience. 

But instead of talking about whether or not your target demographic is a mom between the ages of 35-40, with a preference for lattes, bulldog videos on TikTok, and drives a minivan, I want to talk about understanding what’s going on in her mind—specifically, her stage of awareness.

Touted by the copywriting great, Eugene Schwartz, your prospect’s stage of awareness refers to how much they know about a problem they’re experiencing, what options they have to solve it, and why your product is the one they should pick. 

The 5 Stages of Awareness are:

  • Most Aware: At this stage, your prospect already knows everything about your product and is 100% ready to convert. They just need to be told where to punch in their credit card number so that they can buy.
  • Product-Aware: At this stage, your prospect has a clear idea of what you sell, but hasn’t decided to go for it. They’re on the fence and need a bit more information to help them over the line.
  • Solution-Aware: When your prospect is solution aware, they know what kind of result they want, but have NO CLUE that your product can help them achieve it. 
  • Problem-Aware: When your prospect is problem aware, they understand that they have a big problem, but they have no idea how to solve it or that a solution might exist.
  • Completely Unaware: At this point, your prospect has no idea who you are, what you sell, or that there’s even a problem that they should worry about.

So when it comes to writing landing page copy that converts, take time to consider what stage of awareness your prospect is in when they land on your page. 

What do they already know? 

What do they need to know in order to make an informed decision? 

What are their hesitations about buying and how can you speak to them directly?

The more you can understand the stage of awareness your prospect is in—by asking questions like the ones above—the higher your chances of hitting the conversion rates you’re looking for. 

2. Limit your requests

The internet (and life!) can be full of distractions. Going back to our bulldog-watching, latte-loving mom from earlier, let’s say that you sell a jitter-free coffee alternative and want to create a landing page that will drive her to opt-in and request a free sample. 

If you use your landing page as an opportunity to also barrage her with “download this free report on the negatives of coffee” or “sign up here for a 10% off coupon” or  “learn more about our company” or “check out our latest arrivals,” you run the risk of:

1. Overwhelming her into INaction 

…and…

2. Could drive her away from your landing page altogether—distracting her from doing the original action you hoped for.

If you were to thumb through a stack of high converting landing pages, you’d see that most stay very focused.  Because trying to do otherwise will leave you with an overwhelmed prospect and a conversion rate that falls flat.

Which leads me to…

3. Make your Calls to Action (CTAs) strong & clear

You’ve experienced it before. You see an ad while scrolling through Facebook and you click through to its landing page. Except, as you start to read down the page, you can’t figure out how to order because they’ve buried the “Buy Now” button and their messaging is more clever than clear. So what do you do? You leave.

The reality is, confused people don’t buy. 

In order to write landing page copy that converts, you’ve got to make it crystal-clear what you want your prospect to do. You can’t expect them to just know, so feel free to spell it out for them in detail. 

Consider your own CTAs. How can you make them more specific? How can you make the path from point A to point B, even more clear?  

Pulling it all together

The secret to writing landing page copy that converts is that it helps lessen friction and uncertainty in your prospects. By joining the conversation already taking place in their mind, you can create a solid bond and increase that know, like, and trust factor that’s an essential part of conversion.

Then, drop in a clear and strong CTA and get ready—it won’t take long before your pipeline is flushed with paying customers.

mapping user flows for landing pages and paid ads

How (and why) You Should Optimize Landing Page Copy For Each Target Audience

mapping user flows for landing pages and paid ads

When we think about developing 1:1 messaging for our targeting audiences, our brains immediately think: ad creative. Making sure that the image, caption and headline speak directly to the audience you’re targeting is critical to our success as a growth marketing agency, for sure. But it’s equally as important to think about the landing page experience, too. 

CRO is a big, broad (and kinda vague) marketing term we like to throw around a lot. We could write about CRO strategies, best practices, and what’s been successful for our partners for days. For the purpose of this blog, we’re focusing on developing landing pages for paid campaigns that use value props and messaging specific to different target audiences to improve the user experience.

Optimize existing landing pages with small copy tweaks

The targeting options are almost endless on paid social, and there’s so many different combinations of interests and behaviors that could indicate a user fits in your audience persona. Oftentimes, we’ll find ourselves running several prospecting audiences at once, all applicable to our target audience persona, but potentially different in the actual ad channel.

Take this example from one of our partners, Sharetown. Their target audience is anyone living in a suburban area, with an entrepreneurial spirit, that’s looking for a side hustle. They’re probably married, have a family, and between the ages of 25-40. There are SO MANY different ways of targeting that group of people on Facebook – and we’ll test several ad sets to see which targeting combo is most efficient. 

building facebook audiences in ads manager

 

The Dave Ramsey interest audience has always been a top performing audience for us – a personal finance guru of sorts who teaches his followers how to get out of debt and build their personal wealth. When the conversion rate to our original landing page started to dip, we built out a new version of our main paid social landing page that uses terminology the Dave Ramsey audience is familiar with.

landing page example for social ads

 

This simple copy tweak in the hero zone of our landing page increased our conversions 38% the first month we implemented it. 

From a strategic perspective, we didn’t start out with custom landing pages for each and every interest audience on Facebook. We instead focused on testing new landing pages for all of our audiences to find pockets of success. After we ran campaigns to our top performing paid landing page for a bit, scaled budget, THEN saw our CVRs dipping, we refreshed the landing page we drove our top performing prospecting audience to with copy that was most  relevant to them.

Build custom landing pages based on each audience persona’s pain points

If the targeting options are there, and you’re able to clearly segment your campaign structure with two to three audience personas, there’s nothing wrong with building out ad experiences that are custom to each of their pain points. 

The key to being successful with this approach: ensuring that your audience in the ad channel is specific enough to resonate with more individualized messaging, but not compromising your audience size with targeting that’s too narrow. 

Take our partners over at Multiverse for example. Our Tuff team helped build awareness around their software engineering apprenticeship program in the U.S. Multiverse has two different B2B audiences for this program, and we were able to target narrowly enough to prevent overlap between the two main personas, while making sure our audiences were a decent size.

After researching the audience targeting capabilities on LinkedIn, we decided to create custom ad journeys and landing page experiences for each persona. Why? Because they experience very different pain points, and our value props were stronger when we could use 1:1 messaging for each audience. 

mapping landing page to paid ads  ppc landing page

paid search landing page optimization  paid search landing page design

The copy is close, and maps back to a similar value prop, but articulates the problem in a way that’s customized to each audience. We’re only able to speak directly to each audience persona in this way because the targeting options work in our favor on LinkedIn. 

Paid search and how your landing page experience is critical to success

Quality score, costs on Google, and the landing page you’re driving traffic to all go hand-in-hand. One of the simplest ways to optimize your Google ads campaigns is to make sure that the keyword you’re targeting and your ad copy make it onto your landing page. 

Wizardry does exist where you could dynamically insert keywords into your landing page. You’re able to see strong results with this approach, for sure. Like any dynamic keyword insertion tactic, you do run the risk of things getting a little weird. 

Here at Tuff, our PPC team organizes similar keywords into the same ad group on Google. This structure allows our team to create landing pages that are specific to certain keyword phrases. 

MyWellbeing is an excellent example of this. MyWellbeing is an online therapy platform that matches therapy seekers with therapists that are right for them. One of the things that makes MyWellbeing unique is their matching process – where individuals can select things that are important to them in a therapist. MyWellbeing is particularly successful among the LGBTQIA+ community in New York, because it’s hard to find LGBTQIA+ therapists that can truly relate with what the therapy seeker is going through. 

We saw that keyword phrases like “lgbtq therapist in nyc” is a top performing keyword for us in terms of clicks and volume, but didn’t stand out in terms of conversion rate. To optimize the landing page experience and improve our overall quality score on Google ads, we incorporated those search terms into the hero zone of that landing page.

landing page for specific keyword

This landing page tweak led to a 25% conversion rate for our paid search campaigns.

Landing pages for paid campaigns can always be tested and improved upon. It’s so easy to focus on your ad creative and targeting, but the reality is that your landing page experience has a stronger impact on your paid performance than almost any other campaign element. 

There are so many ways to approach a landing page test. The next time you start brainstorming ways to improve your campaign, try a 1:1 messaging approach, and let us know how it goes! 

testing different desktop landing pages

A/B Testing Your Landing Page to Reduce CAC: Tiny Changes & Big Result

testing different desktop landing pages

There are so many pieces to a growth marketing campaign that it can be hard to tell which levers you should pull to make the biggest impact. Or which levers need a bit of work. That’s where A/B testing comes into play. It’s important to facilitate thoughtful A/B tests for your landing pages, ad creative, audience targeting, CTAs, color choices… and well, almost every single element in your marketing campaigns.

Proper A/B testing takes patience, especially CRO and landing page tests. Here at Tuff, we map out our A/B tests like a science experiment, focused on testing one variable at a time so we know exactly what drove the most impactful results. This approach is methodical and can take a bit of time to execute, but in the end, we’re able to optimize our conversion rates, and scale our budgets while maintaining a profitable CAC.

Note: Throughout this article, I’m going to be referencing one of our partners, Sharetown. Our goal is to increase the number of reps on their team by 15% each month, with a CAC of $900. A rep is someone on their team who picks up and resells like-new furniture as a side hustle. 

We have campaigns running on Facebook/Instagram, Google Search, and YouTube. We also just started growth content to help with organic growth. 

Our landing page test methodology

For Sharetown, we didn’t propose a complete redesign. Instead, we focus on implementing impactful, but sometimes small, design changes to the existing page’s layout, copy, and images to help increase conversion rate. 

landig page example

It’s also important to isolate as many variables as possible throughout testing so that you can definitively say what improved (or negatively impacted) results. Not all CRO landing page tests go as planned, but with our testing methodology, we can always go back to the previous version of the landing page and start again with a new variable to test. 

That’s why we structure our tests bracket-style. (Any other March Madness fans out there? We see you.) We’ll have two almost identical campaigns running in our paid channels, but with the ads pointing to two different landing pages. We’ll take the winner, and pit it against the next iteration of the landing page. 

Statistically Significant Testing

Before we make any calls on what worked and what didn’t, we have to make sure that each landing page gets enough traffic to make our insights meaningful. That’s why we aim for 500-1,000 clicks per landing page before choosing the winning landing page. This threshold can be different for every brand, but we normally base the amount of traffic we need on historical conversion rates and CAC. 

Establish a Baseline

Even if your marketer’s gut instinct says that the landing page you currently have is going to be a total dud, we still recommend running campaigns with it to establish a benchmark. This will give you the data you need to compare future iterations.

But what the heck do we even test first?

Big Landing Page Elements to Test

Once you’ve established a baseline with the existing landing page that needs a little love, we start by updating the following thing (elements that we’ve identified as having the biggest impact based on previous experience)

  • Changing the images throughout the page
    • Incorporate images that don’t look like stock photography
    • Incorporate designed infographics/explainers that are more intelligible and helpful
  • Rewriting the copy to make the page more action-forward and incorporating value props more clearly
  • Rearranging the layout of the page to display value props in a more prioritized order
  • Changing CTAs and button colors
  • Adding simple “how it works’ sections 
  • Incorporating social proof and testimonials

Sample Landing Page Test Plan

The sample landing page test plan below is from a test we conducted with Sharetown. This test is still a work in progress, and we’ll update with more data as we get the results.

landing page testing plan

If you’re interested in doing something similar, here’s a sample gantt chart template we use to plan for landing page tests

Phase 1: Existing Page – Establish Baseline

  • Over the course of three weeks, drive traffic to the current page to establish a baseline with paid acquisition channels running (vs. just organic/referral/direct sources)
  • This will also give our channel experts an opportunity to collect initial acquisition data to refine targeting and ad creative

Phase 2: Two New Landing Pages – New Layout, Testing Different Copy

  • Phase 2 is where we start our landing page test, now that we’ve established a baseline as part of Phase 1. 
  • We’ll create a new layout to use for both landing pages, but each landing page will have different copy, specifically on the hero image and button. The design will stay true to the integrity of the existing Join The Team page, with updates to the layout and the order in which certain sections and elements appear. 
  • Variables to Test:
  • Header image copy
  • Button copy
  • Number of Landing Pages to Develop: 2

Phase 3: Brand/Partner Recognition

  • We’ll take the winner of Phase 2, and pit it against Phase 3’s landing page
  • Variable to Test
    • Placement of brand recognition
  • Number of Landing Pages to Develop: 1

Phase 4: Video

  • We’ll take the winner of Phase 3, and pit it against Phase 4’s landing page
  • Variable to Test
    • Putting a video in the hero zone
  • Number of Landing Pages to Develop: 1

Phase 5: Opt-In

  • We’ll take the winner of Phase 4, and pit it against Phase 5’s landing page
  • Variable to Test
    • Testing an opt-in pop-up
  • Number of Landing Pages to Develop: 1

Phase 6: Graphics v. Images

  • We’ll take the winner of Phase 5, and pit it against Phase 6’s landing page
  • Variable to Test
    • Using graphics instead of images throughout the page
  • Number of Landing Pages to Develop: 1

Phase 7: Earnings potential calculator

  • We’ll take the winner of Phase 6, and pit it against Phase 7’s landing page
  • Variable to Test
    • Creating an earnings potential calculator (similar to Zenernet’s!)
  • Number of Landing Pages to Develop: 1

Measuring your landing page test

Now for the fun part. Digging in the data to determine if your landing page test was successful. It’s important to take a full funnel approach when you’re evaluating the outcome of your A/B test. 

We create scorecards that allow us to measure conversion rates throughout the funnel, especially when the user journey includes multiple steps. In the Sharetown example, we have four conversion rates that we monitor: 

  • CVR from traffic to lead
  • CVR from lead to application
  • CVR from application to vetted opportunities
  • CVR from vetted opportunities to reps

Our first landing page versions had a killer CVR from traffic:lead, more than doubling that conversion rate from our benchmarking phase. But, by working with Sharetown’s sales team, we realized that the lead quality was quite low, and no one seemed to be converting to become a rep. 

We asked their sales team to give us any qualitative feedback that they had on why these applicants weren’t finishing the process. After gathering a few call transcripts, we realized that many of those leads were only interested in the first half of the rep role — moving bulky furniture. They weren’t interested in the gig when they found out Sharetown reps are required to resell the like-new furniture on a marketplace, like Facebook or Craigslist. 

After realizing that, we made tweaks throughout hero zone to emphasize reselling by changing the copy and switching out the image to show a Facebook marketplace listing.

landing page results

The data in the table above (peep Phase 4), speaks for itself. Our conversion rate from traffic to leads decreased significantly from ~8% down to just 2%, resulting in fewer total leads. But they were the right leads. Our bottom of the funnel conversion rates increased tenfold.

This is a prime example of why it’s important to look beyond initial conversion rates to make sure that your landing page test is actually moving the needle. Without collaborating with Sharetown’s sales team, we would have never known why the leads weren’t converting.

Questions? Comments? Ideas! We’d love to hear from you! Drop us a note.