Elle Ossello

Tuff Growth Marketer, Elle, on Finding a Balance of Creative and Analytical

Elle Ossello

 

Meet Elle, a Growth Marketer at Tuff. Elle partners with Tuff clients to build measurable, data-driven, bottomline growth. She is also an incredibly talented wordsmith, teaching us new words on the reg.

Below she shares about her journey to growth marketing rooted in creative, her connection to bikes, and the cookbook she’s currently dreaming about writing.

Can you tell me a bit about your 3-5 years before Tuff? What were you working on? 

All of the five preceding years before Tuff, I was working as a Copywriter and then Creative Director at a creative-first advertising agency. So, with all the projects that came in the door, we applied our creative lens first and then we were thinking about how to activate that creative. 

All of my coworkers were really great creatives and really big thinkers. And, we would often defer to outside experts to bring our strategies down to earth. So, with Tuff, that was a muscle that I was looking to flex more.

Why did you decide to join Tuff? What was it that made you say ‘yes’?

I was fortunate to have a peek behind the curtain. When I was working at my old agency we had the opportunity to freelance, which is something that is needed in the creative world. I was able to take on clients and run my own small business after hours. And, I was approached by Tuff to help out with paid ad copy. 

I was really impressed by how Tuff is organized, efficient, and has a very clear vision for what creative is going to do. When I saw that there was a job opening for Growth Marketer at Tuff, I knew there were some skills that would need tuning in my toolkit. But Ellen was very encouraging and helped me understand that the creative foundation that I would bring was something that Tuff could use. 

So, the main reason I came on to Tuff was Ellen’s support helping me visualize a path towards being successful in this role. And then the resources that I was granted to kick this skill building off at lightspeed. I clearly saw this path to building a skill set that is valuable in the market and can really help small businesses.

What have you been working on since you joined Tuff? 

Right now I am working with two clients; kind of two and a half as I co-pilot a client with Ellen that will eventually transition into a full-time client of mine. 

One of the clients I’m working with is Joyn. They’re an amazing company with a great vision that’s providing a subscription for a more inclusive way to get a workout in. We’re seeing some neat growth for them which is cool because they’re doing a lot internally to grow as well. 

I’m also working with Offline. They’re also a subscription-based service in Raleigh. On the 1st of every month, Offline sends an email to their subscribers to introduce them to 1-2 local restaurants along with a discount to go check them out. It’s been great helping them to better understand the user journey on their website.

What are you fired up about at work right now? 

Content Marketing and Organic Growth is where a lot of my eagerness to dive deeper is stemming from right now. We’re having this conversation the day after our new Content Marketing Manager has signed his offer letter so I’m really looking forward to working with him on these areas. And, helping our clients understand how their audience finds their websites and how to provide a smart answer at the right time, in the right place. 

Elle Ossello

What advice would you give to a founder who is also diving into learning more about growth marketing?

Often when somebody is first starting their business they obsess about logo and visual branding because they are so tangible. It is a concrete way to show up in the world. But, I’m putting together a presentation right now for a client to first answer the questions: what are you creating and who wants it? How can you bring those people to your business? 

Brand and creative only goes so far because you’re kind of throwing it into the world and hoping people are going to find it and connect. Growth marketing is a different exercise in showing up where people already exist. You’re not asking them to move towards your brand but giving them something while they’re in a space to receive it. 

In general, for founders, I think growth marketing can feel like something that just comes later when there is a budget for it. But it can teach you so much about where people are in the world right now and when they’re in need of what you have to offer. 

What do you like doing outside of work? 

I love bikes. Bikes are a vehicle for not only being out in the world and moving through it in a way that’s just so gratifying but there’s a connection component. I love pedaling with friends and letting the topics flow. I use bikes as a way to connect to myself in the world and my people. I’m lucky to live in a town that has back trails snaking through it. 

I also love gardening and home projects, you know, essential 30-year old things. I like learning how to use new tools and how to have a vision for a space and bring it to life. Stretching my brain in ways that are really tactile is gratifying as a person who sits in front of a computer. Cooking also scratches that itch for me. I love experimenting with recipes and have been compiling the beginnings of a cookbook aimed at helping people create beautiful dishes using what they grow themselves – that’s a bucket list item for me. 

And, of course, my dogs and husband are my favorite parts of life outside of work!

What is something about you that typically surprises people? 

My impression of myself is that I’m a super open book. I love to walk through my thinking so there is rarely a scenario where somebody asks me ‘well, how did you come to that conclusion?’ and I would be protective of that answer. I am always eagerly willing to share it.

What advice would you give to someone who is looking to make that transition from a more creative marketing to a more analytical role?

Something I could have done better in my time spent working in the creative world is really thinking about and empathizing with the immediate problems and motivations of a founder. A brand voice is a really nice thing to have and I’ve seen clients glow and get goosebumps when you get it right. It’s amazing. 

However, I think there’s a wrinkle between giving people great creative, and then understanding how to use it to grow their business. Turning that brand voice into value propositions, which can be picked off the paper and put onto a landing page, is something that’s really helpful. So, practice thinking about the immediate problems that founders are trying to solve and deliver creative in a way that can be put to work with minimal legwork.