Tag Archive for: ecommerce content marketing

How to do an eCommerce SEO Audit

How to Conduct an eCommerce SEO Audit and Checklist

How to do an eCommerce SEO Audit

eCommerce stores should always be optimizing (ABO). An eCommerce SEO audit and strategy will help you optimize your website and increase organic traffic and conversions. 

The purpose of an SEO site audit is to ensure that your website is optimized to your customers’ expectations and search engine best practices. 

Search engines use complex algorithms with multiple ranking factors to deliver the most relevant search results for user queries. These algorithms are constantly being updated so as to only display search results from relevant and updated websites. This is why it’s so important to periodically conduct SEO audits of your website to ensure that it remains relevant regardless of the changes to Google’s algorithm. 

What Is an eCommerce SEO Audit?

An eCommerce SEO Audit is an extensive review of your eCommerce website’s SEO efforts accompanied by recommendations on how to supercharge your eCommerce growth. It helps you figure out which SEO issues your website has, which issues to prioritize, and how to increase your organic reach, traffic, and conversions.

Essentially, an eCommerce SEO audit points out the problems, if any, and how to fix them. It helps you figure out how to optimize your website better and increase organic traffic

Why Is An eCommerce SEO Audit Important?

An eCommerce SEO audit takes stock of your current SEO efforts and incoming organic traffic. Just like any other channel, maintaining and growing your traffic source is crucial to surviving and thriving in business. 

But unlike paid channels, organic traffic is long-term. The effort that you put in today will likely benefit your business years down the road, which makes it that much more important. 

Organic traffic is typically one of the highest converting channels, if you’ve done your keyword research correctly when building your content strategy

How To Audit an eCommerce Website 

We typically use SEMrush, Google Search Console, Google Analytics, and an extensive manual review to conduct eCommerce SEO audits. These tools will help with technical SEO issues and traffic data but there’s nothing like manually reviewing your most important web pages. 

What To Look For In An SEO eCommerce Audit/ SEO Audit Checklist

There are very important things that you must access while you’re running your eCommerce website audit and they are:

  • Technical SEO
  • Website architecture
  • User experience
  • Off-page SEO
  • On-page SEO & CRO
  • Competitive analysis
  • SEO Content

Technical SEO

Site health audit of a Tuff Client

The technical SEO of your website requires analyzing the structure of your website and its relevance, indexing, and ranking of the website by search engine crawlers. It examines and recommends fixes for indexing, duplicate content, 404 errors, broken internal links, your XML sitemap, and more.

For eCommerce specifically, you’ll want to make sure that you have product structured data schema in place for your product pages. 

Crawlability

The discoverability of a website is hinged on the internal and external links and this is how search engine crawlers are able to discover your website’s content. These crawlers, through the links, analyze the structure of your website and deduce its relevance and ranking in SERPs. 

The homepage is your most important page. The crawler crawls all links from your homepage and determines how important they are based on the crawl depth and the number of internal and external links pointing to it. 

Indexing comes before everything when ranking. If it’s not indexed then it can’t rank in SERPs. So, if your webpage isn’t optimized and relevant for a specific search term, search engines won’t send their users to it. 

XML sitemap 

Your XML sitemap should contain all the indexed pages on your website. It’s important to make sure that your sitemap is auto-populating when pages are added or removed from your website.

Having pages in your XML sitemap that no longer exist and vice versa will cause technical SEO issues and will make it tougher for you to rank in SERPs. The XML sitemap is what is submitted to Google Search Console and is the first place that Google’s crawler will crawl so it’s important to make sure that it’s up-to-date and optimized. 

For eCommerce websites, we’ll also want to make sure that we have an XML sitemap index and separate sitemaps for blog posts and product pages. That way if there’s ever an issue with a product page it’s easier to identify and fix.

No Duplicate Content Issues

Duplicate content refers to content that appears on several pages either on the same domain or across many domains. Most eCommerce websites have filter pages that create the risk of having duplicate content. 

Duplicate content arises from filtering products based on some specifications, and copying and pasting product descriptions from manufacturers. An SEO audit helps to detect and prevent the presence of duplicate content by the introduction of canonical tags. These tags specify to search engines which URL they should index and rank.

No Broken Internal Links, 404 Errors, and Redirect Loops

A technical SEO audit will detect if there are any broken links or 404 errors. Broken links typically occur if a page has been (un)intentionally deleted from a website or two pages are accidentally linked together with the same URL. Broken links distort the user experience and also make it difficult for search engine crawlers to crawl your website.

404 errors really hinder the user experience when a user lands on one, no matter how great your 404 page is. If dozens of broken links or 404 pages are discovered it will severely impact your chances of ranking high in SERPs. The technical SEO portion of the SEO audit helps you find these issues and fix them before your users find them.

A redirect loop is another version of a 404 error and it is essentially a redirect that redirects too many times. This happens when you redirect an old page to a new one and then later on you redirect that new page to a newer page. We want to avoid redirect loops because they’re essentially 404 pages that take even longer to get to.

HTTPS

This ensures a safe connection to your website. The SSL certificate used by HTTPS encrypts the data that is transferred from the website to the server. You must ensure that all your website data is hosted on a secure URL using the HTTPS protocol. Enforcing HTTPS on all your pages is a best practice because Google has confirmed that it is a ranking signal.

On-page Analysis 

An on-page analysis is focused on a webpage’s content strategy as well as the HTML elements that allow search engines to recognize the relevance of the webpage during a search query. Every on-page optimization done on the webpage should be based on keyword research. Keyword research determines your title tag, meta description, heading, and interlinking.

eCommerce Customer Service Content

eCommerce customer service content example

eCommerce Customer Service Content is one of the most important on-page SEO optimizations that an eCommerce website can make. This refers to the SEO-optimized content that is below your product listings on your product listing page. 

Take a closer look next time you’re ordering from a larger retailer such as Amazon, Best Buy, and others. You’ll notice that they all this customer service content. 

The purpose of this content is to answer frequently asked questions while also giving your page a better chance of ranking in SERPs. When selecting which questions to answer, you want to make sure you’re using target keywords and semantically related keywords in your answers. 

Crawl Depth and Orphan Pages

The crawl depth refers to the number of clicks it takes, from the homepage, to reach a page on your website. Crawl depth is important because search engine crawlers consider your homepage your most valuable page and then they value each other page based on the crawl depth, among other factors.

An orphan page is a page that doesn’t have any links pointing to it. A crawl depth is taken during an SEO audit and it is used to find orphan pages and important pages with a crawl depth of more than 3.

You can improve your crawl depth by improving your internal linking. Adding links to the header and/or footer is a quick way to lower your crawl depth.

Title Tags and Meta Description 

Title tags appear when the webpage is displayed in SERP, browser tab title and when you share the link on social media. Since it appears in these places, the primary keyword of the page should always be in the title tag. 

Meta descriptions are very important in boosting click-through rates. Although it doesn’t determine the ranking of your webpage, it increases traffic to your website. 

Keyword Research

Keyword research and competitive analysis are always essential when doing SEO. It’s too much to get into for this article so I’ve linked out to some useful blog posts throughout this article that will help with keyword research. 

Product Pages

Through keyword research and keyword mapping, you want to make sure that every single product page is SEO-optimized for a unique target keyword. 

Example of Ecommerce Keyword Mapping

Here’s how to quickly conduct keyword mapping for your individual product pages:

  1. Export a list of all of your URLs along with their SEO title and meta description to a spreadsheet. ScreamingFrog is a great tool for getting this information. If you’re using WordPress with the Pro feature of Yoast then you can also export the target keyword from the Yoast field as well. 
  2. Once you have a list of all of your product URLs, add a column for the target keyword and fill in the target keyword for each product URL. You can deduce the target keyword from the URL, SEO title, and meta description. If you can’t, then the page isn’t correctly optimized for a target keyword. Make note of it and come back to it. 
  3. As you go through all links, make note of pages with no target keyword, irrelevant or incorrect target keywords, and keyword cannibalization issues. 
  4. Once you’ve built your list of pages that need new keywords, conduct keyword research and optimize each individual page for the new target keyword.

Internal Linking

linking all your web pages makes it easier for search engine crawlers to navigate your site and find all the important pages. More so, it makes it easier for users to find your products if they’re linked throughout blog posts and “Related Products” sections. 

Example of suggested products

Off-page Analysis

This refers to all external backlinks and signals that can influence your eCommerce website’s ranking in SERPs. You can conduct a backlink audit using SEMrush to see what percentage of your backlinks are higher quality or low quality. 

You can also view backlinks that you’ve recently lost and reach out to the webmaster to regain that backlink if you choose to. 

Content Gaps and Opportunities 

By running a keyword gap analysis against your competitors, you’re able to not only find keyword and content gaps but also potentially content type gaps. 

By analyzing your competitors’ top pages you’re able to see which types of content are driving the most organic traffic. Maybe they have an infographic that is outranking all of their product pages or maybe it’s a guide or landing page.

By finding and filling the gaps you’re creating comprehensive coverage on your website and giving yourself a much better chance of ranking in SERPs.

Example of Keyword Gap Analysis

User Experience 

Your website should always meet the expectations of the user and search engines. For example, no user or search engine would like to be on a website that is extremely slow to load. For eCommerce websites specifically, this can lead to cart abandonment and that can decrease your conversion rate. 

Conclusion

Although it takes time, with SEO tools at your disposal, and some experience, you can learn how to quickly conduct audits and spot these issues whenever you’re browsing your eCommerce store. You can also choose to hire an eCommerce growth agency to take care of all your eCommerce needs.

 

As already stated, different aspects of SEO optimization act together to make your website trustworthy, not for the search engines alone, but for your potential customers. As an eCommerce business, it is important to have a reliable website.

An Ecommerce Guide to Optimize Product Page SEO

With so many ecommerce companies using paid search ads, you might be thinking—does product page SEO really matter? The answer is yes.

Businesses need a holistic growth marketing strategy that combines SEO and paid search. It is not an either/or situation – and as an ecommerce growth agency, we incorporate both strategies for our partners. 

Paid search can help you grow fast and stay competitive. If your site is new, it can get you to the top of search results faster. However, you pay for every click that comes to your website. On the other hand, organic search provides sustainability and long-term growth. You don’t pay for clicks, and you could get traffic from SEO-optimized product pages and content years after it was first published. 

Here are just a few reasons why organic search is so important to ecommerce businesses.

 

What is product page SEO? 

A product page is a landing page on your website that provides all the product information that a customer needs to make an informed purchase. Great product pages don’t only provide product information–they are intentionally designed to entice visitors to buy. 

Product pages are transactional, meaning that most visitors are in the market to buy. However, that doesn’t mean that they will. If your product pages are not optimized for conversions or SEO, then they aren’t generating nearly as much revenue as they could. 

Product page SEO is the practice of optimizing product page descriptions, structure, content, and other elements to increase your visibility and overall organic search traffic. With SEO-optimized product pages, you can rank higher in search results and get more visitors to your site. 

How to optimize your product pages 

There are a lot of elements to consider when creating product pages–increasing conversions, providing shoppers with product details, creating the best user experience, and more. How does SEO fit in? 

SEO’s impact may not be obvious on the page, but it is a key part of why many ecommerce brands have been successful. To optimize your product page SEO, follow these tips. 

1. Include keywords in your product names and titles. 

What makes a good product page title? It should be descriptive, but also include keywords.

Keywords are the search terms that your potential customers are using when they search for products like yours. To determine if a query is a good keyword for you, conduct keyword research. 

Look for terms that have high monthly search volume and low keyword difficulty. For example, if someone is searching for “fanny pack”, the search volume looks like this: 

Now, the keyword difficulty, or competition to rank is fairly high, but it’s not impossible to rank. To really develop your keyword strategy, you’ll want to add variations and long-tail keywords.

  • A keyword variation might be a description like the available colors “pink fanny pack” or a synonym like “belt bag”.
  • Long-tail keywords are queries that have around 4 words or more. They are usually in the form of questions, but not always. Although they aren’t usually product page keywords, they are great for longer-form how-to or informational SEO content.

Now, once you have a list of keywords that are associated with your products, you can create SEO titles. 

If you search for “fanny pack” (and many other products), you’ll eventually see Amazon in the results. It’s because Amazon is using product page SEO best practices. Its product listings have specific requirements for titles. If you look at Amazon’s product naming guidelines, you may notice that they are designed for SEO. 

For instance, they must include a descriptive keyword, and they have title length limits. Amazon’s title length is 80 characters max, but we recommend under 60. 

Here’s an easy-to-use format for creating SEO-friendly product titles: 

  • Primary Keyword – Description (material, color, or size) – Brand Name

It’s also important to note that you may rank for product category pages with SEO, in addition to individual product pages. Category pages tend to have more general keywords (belt bags and fanny packs), whereas, product pages may be more specific (faux leather belt bag). 

2. Make sure your product URL structure is descriptive.

The URL structure of your product pages is more important than you may think. The URL appears at the top of the browser, and although, it may not be read by shoppers as much as your title, search engines are reading it. 

Good URL structure helps Google crawl and index your site. Bad URL structure can impact your organic search performance. Common URL issues for ecommerce sites are duplicate and non-descriptive text. 

Avoid URLs that look like this: 

https://company.com/skincare/collections/product/index.jsp?productId=1234567

It’s long. It includes a lot of numbers that are not descriptive. Plus, it’s missing keywords. Instead, opt for a URL like this: 

  • https://company.com/product/keyword

Cooking company Caraway does this beautifully. For instance, look at the product page for its fry pan

The keyword “fry pan” is right in the title and URL. Overall, the URL structure is short, descriptive, and SEO friendly. 

3. Use canonical tags to eliminate duplicate content.

Even if you have a consistent, keyword-rich product URL structure, there are common SEO issues that happen with every ecommerce site. This is because ecommerce sites may have many variations of the same product. 

For instance, you could have one product, but different sizes, materials, and colors. Each product variation creates a unique URL, even though the content on the page doesn’t change much. 

In addition, many ecommerce sites use breadcrumb navigation. The URL structure changes based on how you clicked through the site to eventually land on the product page. 

This creates duplicate content issues for ecommerce sites. To solve this, you’ll want to implement canonical tags. 

Canonical tags tell Google and other search engines that a specific URL is the master URL. 

By implementing rel=canonical tags, you let Google know that it’s not duplicate content.

4. Add unique product descriptions.

If you don’t have unique product descriptions, you’ll run into two major problems–duplicate content and likely, lower conversions. Product descriptions are written first for buyers, not bots. 

That said, a good product description for buyers should also be good for SEO. Here are some tips for writing product descriptions for SEO and conversions: 

  • Include the most important information above the fold. 
  • Highlight benefits, but provide a bulleted list of product features.
  • Include keywords in your product description.
  • Put yourself in your buyer’s shoes.
  • Make it skimmable–include icons and bulleted lists.
  • Eliminate empty words–every word should add meaning to the description.
  • Answer common questions–what is the product, what does it do, and why is it worth buying?

For an example of product page descriptions that work, look at Glossier. 

The product description for Glossier’s milky jelly cleanser includes all the important information (pricing, sizes, etc.) above the fold. It includes keywords like “conditioning face wash” and “gel face wash” throughout. It is also easy to read with short descriptions, product images, and bulleted lists. 

5. Add high-quality product images, but watch out for loading speed.

A fast loading speed is critical to ecommerce websites. Unbounce reports that 70% of shoppers say page speed influences their likelihood of buying from an online store. 

Page speed impacts the user experience, and it’s a ranking factor for search engine optimization. Ideally, your pages will load within one to two seconds. 

Many factors impact page loading speed, but the size of images is one of the easiest that you can control. The rule of thumb for images is to keep the size below 70 KB. 

If you are having a difficult time reducing the size without impacting quality, you can try a smaller image size. You can also change image formats. For example, a JPEG image usually has a much smaller file size than a PNG. 

6. Name image files with keywords and add alt text.

Speaking of product images, make sure that when you upload them, they are named descriptively using keywords. For example, instead of adding a product image that is titled “image1.png”, rename it with a descriptive keyword like “blue-fanny-pack.png”

Then, add alt text. This is descriptive text that appears for screen readers, and in case an image doesn’t load on your site. It’s not only important for SEO but for accessibility standards.

7. Embed product videos.

Video content can vastly improve your product page conversions. Combine it with SEO, and you can have more traffic and potential customers. 

Sometimes, the best way to describe how your product works is by showing how it works. Site visitors that watch a product video are 73% more likely to buy. Of course, the quality of the product video is important too. Some quick tips for product videos are: 

  • Keep it short–under 30 seconds.
  • Show how your product solves a problem. 
  • Bring the product to life–go beyond an image and show the product in action.

Another advantage of product videos for SEO is that, if they are set up with schema, they can appear in Google’s rich video snippets. (More on that below.)

8. Add schema markup to appear in rich results.

Google is continuously adding more search results features to help users discover products. Rich results, also called rich snippets, are Google search results that go beyond the basic text and blue link format. They can be image carousels, videos, or interactive elements. Common rich results for ecommerce companies are:

  • Product – (Popular Products)
  • Reviews – (Star ratings and customer reviews)

To appear in rich results, there are specific product page SEO requirements–mainly structured data or schema markup. You can test whether or not your product pages support rich snippets by adding the link to Google’s Rich Results Test.

9. Include social proof, most importantly reviews.

Out of all the elements on a product page, you can bet that people will read reviews no matter what. In fact, 93% of customers read online reviews before making a purchase. 

It is probably obvious by now that reviews influence a customer to buy a product. However, did you know that reviews also impact SEO? 

Reviews act as trust signals for customers and search engines. If you feature reviews from real customers on your site, you could be rewarded with a higher search engine ranking. 

Allbirds has some of the best product page reviews. For example, on the product page for its men’s wool running shoes, visitors can search inside reviews. It signals that Allbirds cares about customers’ experiences, and makes it easier for new customers to research. 

Visitors can sort and filter results to look for past buyers that have similar shoe sizes, widths, and more. 

10. Pair product pages with high-quality SEO content.

Product pages are instrumental to any ecommerce site. However, they are designed for people that already have some idea of what they want. In other words, visitors may be in the consideration or conversion stage of the customer funnel already. But, what if a purchase requires a little more education? What if a customer is familiar with a product, but isn’t sure what size or other features they need? 

High-quality SEO content like how-to blogs can help educate consumers about your products in ways that product pages can’t. 

Take REI for example. The outdoor gear and clothing store is taking a holistic approach to its marketing. You can tell because they appear on the first page of results in paid search, organic results, and rich snippets for highly relevant keywords. It doesn’t cannibalize keywords because each result is different. For example, there are local searches for retail locations and keyword-based results. 

In addition, when you search for “sleeping bags”, REI appears in Google’s Popular Products as well as general search results. 

Now, in addition to optimizing its product pages for SEO, REI is optimizing content. Using sleeping bags as an example, a question that people searching for sleeping bags often have is what temperature rating do you need? 

Temperature ratings are a sleeping bag product feature that new buyers may not be familiar with, so it’s worth educating them through long-form SEO content. In fact, REI does just that. Looking at this blog on How to Choose a Sleeping Bag, you’ll see one of the first sections is “Understanding Sleeping Bag Temperature Ratings”.

 

REI is currently ranking for the keyword “sleeping bag temperature ratings”, as well as other sleeping bag-related queries.

Of course, much more goes into optimizing product pages for ecommerce. It’s a good idea to A/B test changes to a product page to see how it impacts conversions. Fixing technical product page SEO issues can be much more complex too. Features like adding structured schema can take a lot of time and attention to detail. These tips can set you on the right path, but if you want to dive deeper, you may want to seek an ecommerce growth agency with experience in product page SEO to get additional expertise. 

SEO Strategy Overview

How to Develop an Effective Ecommerce SEO Strategy in 2022

SEO Strategy Overview

It’s 2022, and the world has changed. 

Some things haven’t—like the fact that the number of active internet users worldwide is rapidly growing towards 5 billion and that 30% of global web usage comes from people using search engines to find something they want or need. 

But other things have—most notably, how those searches are made, have.

With a market that becomes more competitive every day, you need to have a solid SEO strategy to ensure your eCommerce store can stay afloat. But with so many different approaches and techniques out there, how can you decide which is best for your business?

The good news is that although eCommerce SEO can be challenging, it’s not impossible, and as an eCommerce growth agency, we’ve learned a few things that can be helpful for you. Here are some significant steps to help you get started with your eCommerce SEO strategy today.

When building your SEO strategy, you always want to begin with either keyword research or technical SEO. In this case, we’ll begin with keyword research. 

Keyword research

Keyword research is the most fundamental step in any SEO strategy. To start, you’ll want to use a tool like SEMrush to find out which keywords you should be targeting. You probably already have  a few in mind but by researching your top-performing keywords and pages, you will get insights into which keywords are performing well and it will help you narrow down your list of keywords to the 5-10 most important keywords. 

When doing keyword research, you’ll want to look at the monthly organic traffic of non-branded search terms, the keyword difficulty, and the searcher intent first. 

These metrics will help you narrow down to your 5-10 most critical target keywords for your eCommerce store. These are the ones that: 

  • have a high search volume, but aren’t too broad
  • are relevant to your business – look at the search results
  • have low competition (low keyword difficulty, first page results have low domain authority). 

Doing a quick Google search is the quickest way to determine searcher intent for a keyword. If the top-10 results are unrelated to your business, even though you think the keyword is a great fit, then it’s not a keyword that you want to spend time trying to rank for. 

Note that for eCommerce sites, transactional queries tend to be more critical than informational ones because they drive a higher conversion rate and should be weighted when comparing keywords.

Technical SEO

Technical SEO is the foundational building block of SEO and should be the first step in any eCommerce SEO strategy.

It entails:

  • Running an SEO audit of your existing website;
  • Creating a plan to fix any technical issues, and 
  • Implementing technical SEO fixes before adding additional content to your website. 

The last thing an eCommerce agency wants to do is invest resources into content creation to find out the site isn’t even crawlable or has major accessibility issues that kill the user experience.

Another technical SEO implementation to be aware of for eCommerce websites is making sure you’re adding structured data schema to your product pages. By adding the appropriate structured data to your product pages, you can display your price, ratings, and product image directly in Google’s SERP and increase your CTR.

If you spend time now making sure your site is healthy from an SEO standpoint, it will be easier (and cheaper) to make on-page SEO changes as needed in the future.

Example of structured data on SERP

Optimize Site architecture

Ecommerce site architecture will help your users find the information they need while also helping Google find and index your pages.

Look at your navigation structure and make sure it makes sense. Do all categories, subcategories, and products have a logical flow? Will you be adding pages in the future and will they fit into the existing site structure?

To optimize your site architecture:

  • Ensure your categories are easy to navigate and link to the correct pages.
  • Avoid duplicate content
  • Make sure breadcrumbs are in place – breadcrumbs (a navigational feature showing the user’s location within a website)  help users navigate your site, especially if they get lost along the way.
  • Use SEO-optimized page titles – Page titles are like a newspaper headline; they tell the reader (and Google) what the page is about. 
  • Create internal links between relevant categories, products, and landing pages.
  • Focus on user experience by adding necessary filters, tags, or search bars to help users navigate through your website easier. 

 

On-page SEO

If you don’t have the right on-page SEO strategies in place, the chances of your products or services ranking highly in search results are less likely.

Keyword Mapping

The first step of on-page SEO is keyword mapping, making sure each page has a unique target keyword and that the target keyword is relevant. Learn how keyword mapping helped us increase Salam’s organic traffic by 117% in 90 days.

One of the first things to look for during keyword mapping, if you haven’t already during technical SEO, is to find pages that shouldn’t be indexed in Google. It’s important that you’re only indexing pages that have an SEO value to them and benefit your users. 

You can build a keyword mapping spreadsheet by crawling your website with ScreamingFrog and exporting all data to a spreadsheet. From there, you can either determine the target keyword of each URL by analyzing the data in the URL and title or you can export all target keywords from Yoast if you’re using Yoast Premium on WordPress. 

Example of keyword mapping

Once you have a unique target keyword for each page then ensure they are included in the title tag, meta description, and H1 tag of that page. 

Once you’ve done this, it’s essential to optimize your product pages by adding internal links from other pages within your site that contain relevant content. 

Ecommerce SEO Content

A specific eCommerce SEO strategy is adding SEO-optimized content at the bottom of all of your product listing pages. This is a strategy that is widely used by the eCommerce behemoths and has worked very well for our clients. By adding this content at the bottom of your page, it doesn’t interfere with the user experience, helps improve page ranking, and provides useful information for your customers. 

SEO content example for Renogy

Internal linking

Internal linking helps users navigate and find more relevant content on your site while also helping search engines figure out what pages are most important.

Here are some best practices for internal linking:

  • Start with a sitemap. The first step to effective internal linking is creating a sitemap that lists all the essential pages of your website. This is not only good for internal linking but also for crawlability. 
  • Always display “Products You May Like” or something similar on the individual product pages to help improve internal linking and user experience.
  • Make sure every page has at least 2 or 3 internal links pointing to it. This ensures that every page on your site gets some love from Google and visitors alike.
  • Link only relevant pages together. Don’t link one article to another just because you want to link to it somewhere—make sure it’s relevant or valuable to the person reading the content.
  • Use SEO-optimized anchor text when linking pages.

 

Focus on high-converting and high-ticket items

As a general rule, high-search-volume keywords will be more competitive. You can still rank for them, but it’ll take more effort and resources than ranking for low-volume keywords.

The problem with this scenario is that you’re focusing on eCommerce SEO without defining the problem you’re trying to solve beforehand. 

Instead of optimizing for high-volume search terms because someone told you to, defining goals and KPIs is much more effective before beginning an eCommerce SEO strategy. This is something that you will decide when you’re doing your keyword research and narrowing down on your 5-10 most important keywords. 

Determining which specific products generate the highest revenue makes it easier to pinpoint the most valuable pages on your store. 

It is recommended to look at monthly revenue per product if you have hundreds or thousands of products. If you have fewer than 100 products, you could look at quarterly or annual data instead.

If you have low-performing pages that are ranking well, try to find other ways to take advantage of that traffic by adding related products to the page. 

Conversion Rate Optimization

Every extra conversion you make increases your revenue, which means that CRO has a real and direct impact on your company’s bottom line.

eCommerce marketers optimize for CRO in parallel with SEO to provide a seamless experience for your customers from landing on your website, reading your content, and taking that desired action.

It’s all about understanding how users behave on your website and making changes to improve that behavior. And, it’s not just about improving conversion rates; You can also use CRO techniques to reduce bounce rates, increase time on page and enhance visitor engagement.

The main aim of CRO is to create an experience for your customers that will encourage them to complete their purchase or other desired action on your website. 

Conclusion

There you have it—a fully-formed eCommerce SEO strategy that you can use to tackle the rest of 2022 and beyond. You’ve got the tools and the knowledge, and now you just need to get started.

When it comes to developing a successful eCommerce SEO strategy, the key is to understand your customers and what they’re looking for. 

If you can consistently provide the best products and answers to your customers’ questions, you’ll be able to build a strong eCommerce business over time.

A clean desk with a fresh document up for writing a new blog

Powering eCommerce Growth With Content Marketing

A clean desk with a fresh document up for writing a new blog

When we hear from eCommerce companies how they are powering their growth traction with digital marketing, they usually reference their ads performance, how specific products are selling, or how their revenue growth looks from a year over year perspective. 

Rarely do they talk about their eCommerce growth in relation to their organic revenue and content marketing strategy

From our perspective, as an eCommerce growth agency, that should be the number one focus for every eCommerce marketing strategy: generating targeted performance content that search engines will slap on page one. This, most importantly, drives potential customers to your site. And as a bonus, it becomes fodder for sharing in your email newsletter, on social media, and more. 

What is Content Marketing?

“We have a blog!” is the answer we get when we ask brands about their eCommerce content marketing efforts. 

That’s all well and good, but what exactly is on your blog?

If it’s content written for a specific target audience that helps them solve a problem using focus keywords that will enable the search engines to rank you as an authority figure in your industry, then you’re on track. 

If it’s brand content about what your founder had breakfast then keep reading.  

Content marketing is an inbound marketing strategy that eCommerce companies (but really all companies no matter who you’re selling to) should leverage as their go-to lead generation strategy. That’s a bold statement for an agency that also has a robust and powerful team of paid acquisition experts. 

Used in tandem with search engine optimization (SEO), a strong content marketing strategy produces content (think product copy, written articles, infographics, how-to videos) based on keyword analysis and topics related to an eCommerce site’s industry. 

A content strategy agency like Tuff can help you do it, too. 

Why Content Marketing for eCommerce? 

The answer is simple: would you rather pay top dollar for every single keyword you want to rank for in the form of paid search placements or would you prefer to get top rankings for free? 

We’ll assume you went with the less costly approach. 

You may be familiar with content marketing from other industries outside of eCommerce like B2B and SaaS. They produce content like ebooks, white papers, and case studies that contain information that their audience finds useful based on their own unique industry perspective or product. 

eCommerce content strategies are no different, but instead of ebook and white papers, we’re all about helpful guides, how-to articles, and most importantly product pages stacked with content that’s highly optimized for search engines. 

A content marketing strategy for eCommerce enables you to show search engines and most importantly potential customers that you’re an expert on your industry. Just selling products within your industry space isn’t enough, you need to prove that your product or service is solving a problem by being the authority leader in your space. 

How to Create a Content Marketing Strategy for eCommerce

The good news: getting started growing your business with a content marketing strategy for your eCommerce business isn’t rocket science. But it does take some deliberate planning and focused research. 

First, you’ll want to put together a core list of target keywords you want to rank for. 

You might use words you’re bidding for on Google Search campaigns or do research using a search engine marketing tool to find non-branded organic keywords related to your eCommerce industry. 

These will be your focus keywords. As the name implies, you’ll build content around these keywords. For example, check out the focus keywords for this article: 

  • eCommerce content marketing
  • eCommerce growth
  • eCommerce growth marketing
  • content marketing

We’ve chosen them specifically because we know that there’s an opportunity for Tuff to improve our ranking on keywords related to eCommerce content marketing. And the higher we rank, the more people click through to our site. Although we’re not an eCommerce business, the principles hold true: more clicks = more revenue. (How meta is that?)

Once you’ve done your homework, you’ll want to figure out how to incorporate these keywords into a strategy. While there are a number of different ways to go about creating a content strategy, our favorite is the pillar strategy. This is where each keyword focus represents the foundation and you want to build articles off of your foundation to create a pillar. 

Putting These Focus Keywords to Work

Each focus keyword needs to have different types of content built on it. As mentioned, this could be a variety of content types. Consider everything from articles to infographics—this is where things can get tricky, it’s important to create content that is not just designed to attract the attention of search engines, but real humans looking for real answers to their questions. 

The good news: oftentimes many eCommerce brands already have a huge bank of content that they’ve built up over the years. So instead of starting from scratch, it’s possible to take stock of what you’ve already created and design a roadmap for combing through and strategically infusing targeted keywords. This can kickstart a performance content strategy without bucking up and going from 0-60 out the gate.

How to Optimize Your Product Copy with Focus Keywords

A great way to start using your focus keywords is to assign them to top selling products or your entire product catalog (depending on the number of products within your catalog). You will want each of your products to have keyword focus. 

Then using that keyword, it’s best practice to include it within the product title, product description, SEO title, meta description, and product URL. 

This will provide the foundation for your eCommerce content strategy. From here, you’ll want to produce content that features your focus keywords and links back to the foundation product pages that you assigned each specific keyword to. Simple!

Great eCommerce Content Marketing Examples 

Having trouble grasping what a eCommerce content strategy looks like in practice? Here are three examples to show you how it can be done: 

#1) REI.com 

A screenshot of the REI blog with the headline "Expert Advice"

Meet the little-known retailer called REI (kidding). They have a supercharged content strategy that enables them to pull in potential customers on just about any question someone might have about outdoor recreation products. 

Their blog strategy has morphed into what is more clearly defined as a knowledge base on all things recreation equipment—an incredible, powerful, and most notably profitable achievement.  

Strategically creating a knowledge base is becoming a more and more frequent play for eCommerce brands who want to organize their content in a way that enables them to help potential and existing customers on a range of topics. 

Instead of scrolling through endless pages of blog content, website visitors can easily search their knowledge base using a query-based search feature or by selecting topic categories. 

#2) Quietkat.com

A screen shot of the QuietKat blog

For a second selection, here’s a shameless plug for our client, QuietKat, an electric bike brand based out of Colorado. 

We’ve been working with them for the last year to define their SEO content strategy and product content that helps educate existing and potential customers. 

We won’t get too into the nitty gritty of how we do what we do with QuietKat, but take a drive through the QuietKat blog and check out how we’ve designed a content strategy to inform our existing and potential customers on all things electric bikes. 

#3) CulturesForHealth.com

A screenshot of the Cultures for Health blog

The final example of a content strategy from an eCommerce brand we really love is Cultures For Health. Similar to REI, their content is organized within a knowledge base learning center format which enables their website traffic to quickly access the information they need. They can also host multiple types of content together in an aesthetically pleasing fashion that doesn’t look cluttered. 

Their content marketing strategy has allowed them to lay off the paid search play and focus 100% on producing content that their audience loves. 

Here’s a break down of top keywords they rank for and how much organic traffic those keywords generate: 

  • Kombucha – ranking #13 (368,000 searches per month) 
  • Sourdough starter – ranking #16 (201,000 searches per month) 
  • Sauerkraut – ranking #4 (165,000 searches per month) 

Final Thoughts 

While an eCommerce content marketing strategy is not a quick fix, the benefits of a well thought out and executed SEO performance content strategy are huge.

Don’t be in a rush to start ranking on page one for your focus keywords. Rather, build out a strategy and look at from a quarterly growth timeline: where do you want to be ranking in three, six, nine, 12, and 15 months from now? How much content do you need to produce each month to hit your goals? 

Finally, don’t try to do it all yourself. You’ll need some help along the way.

Let a Content Strategy Agency like Tuff help you with the heavy lifting!