pulling reports on a computer from google analytics

The Best Attribution Model for B2C and eCommerce Brands

pulling reports on a computer from google analytics

Attribution is a big topic in the growth marketing world and for good reason. Knowing which channels, campaigns, audiences, and ads hold the most value for your brand’s performance is incredibly important for growth. 

The challenge for B2C and eCommerce businesses though is that running multi-channel growth marketing strategies with perfect attribution is incredibly difficult. And even when you get strategic with Google Analytics attribution models, it’s still not always easy to know exactly how each channel is impacting your bottom line. 

So what should you do to figure out how to scale? 

In this article, I’ll lay out a few different attribution models and look at their pros anc cons, then show you how to analyze conversion paths and use them in tandem with attribution models to (hopefully) give you some deeper insights as to how your channels are doing and where to scale spend. 

Channel Platform Attribution 

As a growth marketing agency, when we hear about astronomical Return On Ad Spends (ROAS) above 5x and getting up into the 20s, it usually has something to do with Channel Platform Attribution. 

Channel Platform Attribution for the uninformed is when you pull performance data from dashboards within the ad platforms you are advertising on. For example, let’s say you’re running Facebook (Meta?) Ads. Within the Facebook Ads Manager, you can see performance metrics that help you understand how your campaigns, ad sets, and ads are performing. 

The logic for using this has generally been that it will be the most accurate because it’s the platform you’re using for the actual ads. 

The thing to remember is that ad platforms like Facebook make the majority of their revenue through their advertising platforms. Therefore, it’s in their best interest to have the most liberal attribution models, because the more that can be attributed to their platform, the more you’ll spend in that platform, the more that platform will make from you. 

Last Click Attribution 

The most conservative of all the attribution models, Last Click is the default attribution model within Google Analytics. 

As the name suggests, Last Click attributes conversions to the ad / channel that was last clicked prior to the conversion. 

Sample Paths

  • Direct > Organic > Google Search / Branded > Conversion 
  • Facebook > Organic > Facebook > Conversion 
  • Facebook > Conversion

In the sample paths above, which channels will be attributed with conversion in a last-click model? 

If you guessed, Google and Facebook for each path, then you are correct. 

The problem with this attribution model is that it was developed prior to multi-channel marketing being as dominant as it is in today’s advertising landscape. 

Once you get past a 1 touchpoint conversion path, attributing the channel / campaign / ad that was last clicked before a conversion is a bit of a stretch. 

Was it the Facebook Ad that was last clicked or was it initially the organic search that led to the session over 5 minutes long where the user dove in on the product and in some ways made up their mind. 

Linear Attribution 

With last click, it’s hard to tell which touch point is driving the conversion. In a linear attribution model, the entire conversion path is given equal weight showing that the whole path contributed to the conversion. 

This inherently reveals that more than one channel contributed to the conversion. 

What it fails to get at is which one. 

The Perfect Attribution Model (Hint: There’s not one)

There is no one perfect attribution model and it’s unlikely that there will be one for the foreseeable future. 

What’s more important than searching for the magic crystal ball that will tell you exactly what platform to put your money into is being able to understand each attribution model and what they’re saying about your strategy. Examining multiple attribution models can give you a better understanding of how your channels are doing than just one individual model. 

In addition, it is critical that you understand how each channel / campaign / ad is driving influence for your conversion. 

For instance, if you see that on average your path lengths are 2x touchpoints long and a high percentage of them that end in conversion are: organic / search > branded / search > purchase

  • What is driving people to search my brand organically? 
  • Is my website ranking for high intent Keywords important to my business? 
  • Am I running social campaigns like Youtube or Facebook Ads that are targeting the right audience but resulting in organic searches rather than direct clicks? 

Using attribution models to tell you which channel to increase spend in that path length example of organic > branded > purchase will not yield an increase in conversion.

Only when you understand the conversion path will you be able to understand where to scale (you know like Yoda would say). 

Analyzing Conversion Paths > Using a Single Attribution Model

One of my favorite tools to use for them is the report in Universal Analytics called “Top Conversion Paths” located in Conversions > Multi-Channel Funnels > Top Conversion Paths. 

multi channel funnels report from Google Analytics

This report defaults to showing path length at the Channel Grouping level, but you can go down to the ad set level. 

It’s a great way to see how many touchpoints on average it’s taking for users to convert and which channels are involved in the conversion. 

It’s even better when you use insights from the report in tandem with multiple attribution models. 

The best way to do this is to manually track your results in a spreadsheet in a Week over week (WoW) cadence. 

For each channel that you’re tracking, you’ll want to include multiple attribution models. 

For example, your tracking spreadsheet might look like this: 

paid media reporting spreadsheet

The above is pulling in the marketing spend for all channels, followed by web traffic, then we segment by Last Click + Assisted and Ad Channel Platforms. 

google analytics tracking spreadsheet

By showing multiple types of attribution models we’re able to drill down on what’s working and what’s not then run comparisons of what’s working against other attribution models. 

The result is not a crystal ball look into what’s driving growth, rather it’s an understanding of what channels are contributing most significantly to your overall growth. 

When you pair these insights with the Top Conversion Path report in Google Analytics, your insights will be far deeper than with any one attribution model. 

A laptop, cordless mouse, yellow glass, pen, and camera on a wooden table.

Boosting Conversion Rate for AKKO: Social Ad Strategy + Creative + Web Design

A laptop, cordless mouse, yellow glass, pen, and camera on a wooden table.

The ability to combine strong social ad strategy with high quality ad creative and landing page optimization has been one of my biggest strategic wins of 2021 as a Growth Marketer at Tuff.

Turns out, it’s also one of the best ways to drive the strongest traffic to a page to convert an action. 

The reason the results are so strong has to do with control. When we can control what the traffic views in our ads, how they enter and the experience they have when they get to the landing page, we’re able to control all aspects of the customer journey and build a seamless funnel to conversion. 

Take for example our partner, AKKO (pronounced kinda like ‘Taco’ but ‘Aco’) a consumer fintech startup that came to us with great PPC traction for their phone and gadget insurance protection plans. 

Knowing that they needed to convert more people than those just searching for products related to their brand with queries like 

  • phone insurance
  • laptop insurance

In essence, they needed to diversify their ad strategy to scale. 

Developing data-driven ad creative and a strong social foundation

To start, we put our resources into getting the right combination of performance creative for AKKO. 

Before we launched ads, we spent 4 weeks putting together a collection of animated and UGC videos between 15 and 30 seconds long that we could test across Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube. 

In hindsight, it would have been a massive misstep for us to use generic cracked phones and waterlogged computer stock images to begin our testing. 

AKKO’s original social ad testing had gone this route and results had been mixed. 

While we developed creative, our social ads and youtube channel experts put together an audience testing plan that detailed who and how we would test our new creatives across a potential audience of 290 Million smartphone users in the United States. 

Launch Ads First Then Optimize 

Now that our foundations were set, we launched ads first and directed them to an existing high-performing PPC landing page.  This allowed us too figure out what ads of our had the most promise. 

We could have launched with generic stock images and spent time working on a social ads landing page but that would have cost us time in the long run though. 

While this approach to setting up a foundation, then launching,  then optimizing was a longer process, it made it far easier for us to adapt with optimizations faster. 

Early Results

The biggest difference between a targeted PPC strategy and a social ads strategy comes down to intent. 

With PPC Campaigns, we’re able to get in front of people who already have a problem and are looking for a solution. 

Generally, with social ads, we’re able to get in front of people who might have a problem and usually don’t know they have a problem. Essentially, we have to create intent in the social ad – give them a reason to realize they have a problem and need a solution. 

The major differences in intent here dictate the landing page experience. 

After a couple of weeks of limited conversions sending ad traffic from social ads to the PPC landing page, we found that the traffic did this on the website: 

ToS (Time on Site) Pgs / Session Purchases CVR
PPC LP 0:00:30 2.31 5 0.30%

In addition, we also used a website session recording tool to watch what the traffic was doing when they got to the website. 

Their scrolling actions and clicks showed a lack of intent. Our ads may have pushed them to the website, but once they landed on the destination URL there wasn’t much to draw their attention. 

For users coming off of PPC campaigns – in the act of searching for a solution to their problem – this type of landing page experience provided information to push them along. 

Social Ads Landing Page 

To counteract low onsite metrics that users exhibited once they got to the landing page, we went back to the drawing board to develop a landing page specifically for our social campaigns that would use strong creative and copy to draw the user in and make the transition from the ad to the website much easier. 

This would be the test to see if it was our ads or overall strategy to develop intent for users within social channels. 

We leaned on FinTech inspiration from neobanks to guide our design concepts. The reason for this was simple – banking is boring. No one is thinking about finding their next bank when they’re scrolling feeds or binge-watching cat videos on Youtube. 

Here’s a peek at the page we developed:

landing page test example

Second Round Of Results

While not immediate, we saw a quick change in behavior by users once they got to our social ads specific landing page. After a couple of weeks of testing, here are our social ads landing page compared to our PPC landing page. 

Before vs. After Last Click Purchases ToS (Time on Site) Pages/Session CVR
PPC Landing Page 5 0:00:30 2.31 0.30%
Social Ads Landing Page 20 0:01:47 4.19 3.86%

We saw a 256% increase in our time on site average when users entered this landing page, but the biggest difference was in CVR and purchases. 

Not only were users more engaged when the website through the destination URL from our ads, their likelihood to convert increased 1,186%. 

Next Steps

While not anywhere close to done, these results provided us with the traction to scale spend on our prospecting and retargeting campaigns. It also enabled us to test new channels. 

From a testing standpoint our next steps involved: 

  • New iterations of our social ads landing page
  • New Ad Creative 
  • New Ad Copy 

For more information on how Tuff tests, optimizes, and scales brands with Growth Marketing across industries click here to download a sample growth marketing proposal. 

customer information on computer

Zero Party Data: What It Means + Why And How You Should Be Collecting It

customer information on computer

As a growth marketing agency, our ability to access customer data is a major (if not the most important) factor in developing growth marketing strategies and executing them to find traction or scale. That’s why—before we spend a dollar with a new partner—we make sure proper tracking is set up and correctly capturing user’s data. 

In the last few months, accessing specific types of data about customers has been increasingly more difficult. It’s a topic that’s so monumental to the future of marketing and even business growth, as well as user privacy, that it’s been making headlines across the world. Don’t get us wrong, though, we believe this is a good thing; consumers should be able to control how their data is used in advertising. 

Despite that, brands should know the realities of what the advertising landscape looks like in a world without pixel tracking. 

There are varying levels of customer data that have become more difficult to access due to restrictions put in place by tech giants like Apple & Google that have reshaped the online advertising space (ahem, iOS 14). To understand how these changes have impacted digital advertising, start by understanding the different types of data. 

The three most common types are first-party, second-party, and third-party data. 

First-Party Data: Company-Owned

First-party data is any data collected by a company about their customers. This information is compiled through a brand’s website and used to develop various marketing strategies that cater to an individual or group (ex: target audience). For example, we use first-party data at Tuff when we look at a brand’s users’ website behavior, listen to inbound sales call recordings, or analyze purchase history to learn more about a company’s existing users and customers. 

Second-party data: Provided by a Partner

Now that you understand first-party data, second-party data will be easy to pick up. Second party data is first-party data that is provided by a known partner. Say you run an online outdoor publication and you know that your customer list would be good for a specific brand that sells backpacking tents. The brand that receives that audience to use in their targeting would be receiving second-party data.

Third-party data: Provided by an Outside Source 

Unlike first-party data, third-party data usually comes from an outside source (third party) that has collected the data about its customers. I don’t want to name names but so let’s make up a third party platform that might collect vast amounts of data about its users to be used for advertising. We’ll call it Facebook. Hypothetically speaking, let’s say Facebook has 2.89 Billion active users on its platform and due to how it tracks users on its platform and used to be able to across the web, then Facebook has copious amounts of data on a large chunk of the world’s population. Facebook then shares that data with advertisers to help them target specific audiences.

That’s third party data! 

Restrictions on Data

20 years ago, the internet embraced digital advertising and, in the process, annihilated traditional forms of advertising like print, FM/AM radio, and television. 

The reason? Hyper-specific targeting. 

Before the internet, advertising used broad targeting that was rather inefficient in comparison to what the internet made possible. Reaching your audience was done through the earlier mentioned traditional forms of advertising and their targeting options were fairly general. 

As Brian X. Chen from the New York Times explained in his article “The Battle For Digital Privacy is Shaping the Internet”, the internet made hyper-specific targeting available at scale and for a much lower cost than radio and tv could sell. 

Brands splashed their ads across websites, with their promotions often tailored to people’s specific interests. Those digital ads powered the growth of Facebook, Google and Twitter, which offered their search and social networking services to people without charge. But in exchange, people were tracked from site to site by technologies such as cookies and their personal data was used to target them with relevant marketing.” 

In April 2021, Apple released an update to their iPhone software called iOS 14 which contained a feature that enabled iPhone users to block their personal information from being shared. The feature has disrupted the advertising industry because it has made it fairly difficult for advertisers to retarget to users as well as measure how their ads are impacting conversion. 

Once a user on an iPhone clicks an ad on Facebook and leaves a Facebook-owned property,  without pixel tracking, we lose the data that tells us where that person came from when they get to the external website and begin their customer journey. 

This makes it incredibly difficult for us to analyze data in such a way that says definitively for every $1 you put into this paid acquisition channel you will receive $5 from a paying customer or with this channel you see an average cost per sale of $10. The reason? We have no idea of the channel source. 

To be clear though – attribution was never perfect, but it’s harder than ever now. 

Meet Zero Party Data: Provided by Your Audience

Zero-party data is optional information that the consumer chooses to willingly provide to a company, to hopefully improve their user experience. 

For example, you might position a “how did you hear about us” survey at the end of your customer journey after they convert. You can then tie the conversion amount to the source and then back to your ad spend to determine effectiveness.

Forrester Research first defined the term as follows:

“Zero-party data is that which a customer intentionally and proactively shares with a brand. It can include preference center data, purchase intentions, personal context, and how the individual wants the brand to recognize [them].”

The great thing about zero-party data is that it displays intentionality between the user or customer and brand.

As SalesForces.com expresses:

“As industry regulations such as GDPR and the CCPA put a heightened focus on safeguarding consumer privacy, and as more browsers move to phase out third party cookies and allow users to easily opt out of being tracked, marketers are placing a greater premium and reliance on data that their audiences knowingly and voluntarily give them.”

Zero-party data doesn’t have to be post-purchase only.

Take StichFix for example, they’ve built the majority of their $2 billion business off of their sign up quiz, which asks users numerous questions about how they feel about shopping and what types of clothes they like to wear to develop a consumer profile for them that enables StitchFix to send their customers customized clothing selections in a subscription service. 

Ultimately, we know that as consumers get savvier and the methods for blocking data trackers like pixels gets more sophisticated, relying on first, second, and third-party data will only get more complex. So, although it takes more time, intentionality, and strategy, we believe zero-party data is the future.

Do you have any strategies in place for collecting zero-party data? Whether your answer is yes or no, we’d love to talk!

kids bike

“Bikes:” How We Helped Cleary Rank on Page 1 And Snag a Slice of the 135k Monthly Search Volume

kids bike

Cleary Bikes is not just any kids bike brand. The company—based out of Oakland, CA—makes among the highest-quality kids bikes out there. Their philosophy: instead of giving your kid training wheels and a rickety frame as they’re taking their first pedal strokes on their own, give them a sized-down experience of what it’s really like to be on trail, in the air, or at the park. That way, they’ll be building real, transferable skills from the get-go. It’s a perspective that resonates. That’s among the reasons that, when we first met the folks at Cleary, we learned their organic revenue was already booming! 

The health of their organic traffic was one of the reasons we were eager to partner with them. We knew that continuing to put in the work to improve Google search results while layering on other acquisition channles would help us build a holistic, long-term, and scalable path to growth. 

When we look at partnering with a brand at Tuff, really any brand, but especially eCommerce, we examine their current traction to help us understand how we plan to craft our Growth Marketing Strategy to help them reach their goals.

For Cleary, our minds were blown (literally), when we saw that organic revenue was the largest sector of their overall revenue d2c eCommerce makeup. 

Here’s how their traffic looked prior to April when we started our partnership: 

organic traffic results

Of their organic traffic, a large percentage of it converted due to Cleary’s success in showcasing the benefits of their bikes, the high quality of their messaging, and the overall praise from their customer base. 

From a growth perspective, we could see that a great formula for growing Cleary’s revenue would be to increase the volume of quality organic traffic to the site. 

This step by step guide lays out how we were able to develop an SEO Growth Content Strategy to increase Cleary’s organic traffic by getting them to rank on page one on Google for keywords specific to their business. 

Step 1: Lay The Technical SEO Content Foundation

No matter what you’re selling – SaaS, physical products, or a service – having the correct Technical SEO foundation for your performance content to work from is the most important thing you can do. 

With Cleary, they happened to be in the middle of a website overhaul so making some of our big changes was a no-brainer for their website and easy to implement. 

Step one was identifying tactics and updates we could implement to help us earn a website health score over 90%. A high health score helps our performance content rank faster and more efficiently. To get to the bottom of what was keeping us from better site heath, we first needed to run a SEO site audit

The results of this audit showed us what to change and included information about page errors, broken links, and more. The site audit also shows us how to fix those errors. 

In addition to the website audit solutions, we also provided Cleary with information about how best to migrate their website. 

Our biggest fear with their website migration and with any website migration is that we’ll lose our organic traction and need to rebuild from square one. This is not a great scenario to confront, so the only way to keep that from happening was to make sure the website migration process was accompanied by a strong SEO perspective.

Here are some of the suggestions we made: 

  • Setting up redirects on the server side for product pages, collections, etc. 
  • Switching to WP Engine servers. 
  • Using a third party migration tool like Cart2Cart

The final suggestions we made addressed Cleary’s product page descriptions and collection page descriptions. We noticed that most of Cleary’s rankings were coming from their home page. To help diversify the high-ranking pages as well as lead high-intent users further into the funnel, we worked with their team to develop SEO-focused copy for the mentioned page descriptions. 

Step 2: Develop A Strategic Content Strategy

As the decade-old saying goes “Content is King!” 

Yes that’s true, but not if the content itself is total garbage 💩

To develop an informed content strategy, it’s imperative to do some research. A great place to start is to first run a keyword gap audit against your brand’s competitors. Here’s the one we did for Cleary to show us where we were weak against their competitor Guardian Bikes. 

seo comparison chart

As you can see in the above “Missing” category, Cleary didn’t have any ranking keywords (KWs) related to bike sizing. Therefore, we determined that our first piece of content needed to be related to sizing. 

Step 3: Produce Content, Publish, Repeat 

This first piece of content wasn’t just a normal article, instead, we created a main hub page, which we called Kids Bike Sizing Guide. This is designed to be a sort of center around which all of our following sizing content could sit. This clustered approach—essentially similar to a whike wheel hub and its spokes—helps communicate to search engine algorithms that Cleary truly is an expert in this topic and therefore should appear at the top of search results.

Leveraging this one hub page, we were able to help Cleary rank for multiple KWs related to kids bike sizing, which tied back into the data we saw in our Competitor Keyword Gap Analysis. Examples of our focus KWs for this hub page were: kids bike sizing guide, bike size guide, bike wheel size chart, bike size chart.

Once we had our hub page developed we began developing auxiliary content pages that were related to our hub page and would help us boost its ranking through internal linking. 

Examples of these auxiliary content pages included a “Bike For X-Year Old Series” that featured more than four content pieces related to kids bike sizes that we could use to support our hub page. 

From there, we were in a great position to begin supporting our other hub pages like our product and collection pages using high volume KWs related to Cleary’s industry, missing and weak topics (from Keyword Gap Analysis), and full-funnel strategy content. 

Step 4: Improve Google Search Results  

Within 60 days, we started to see encouraging results with our Growth Content Strategy for Cleary. 

seo results conversation

Step 5: Keep Repeating The Formula

Just because you land on page one for specific terms doesn’t mean you’ll stay on it forever. Similarly, if you haven’t gotten onto page one for a specific KW, that doesn’t mean you won’t. 

Growth content is a long-term solution, not a quick fix, but you’ll see key indicators of growth like higher search rankings and new traffic within 30-60 days of publishing in most cases. Typically, within four to five months you should see significant traction toward your goals.

Excited about growing your organic traffic but not quite sure where to start? We’ve got your back. Let’s talk about how to level up your site traffic and land you on page one. 

shoes for an ecommerce case study

Stacking the Top of the Funnel: How We Captured High-Value Email Leads for Canoe Club

ecommerce quiz example

Among our list of eCommerce partners, the central focus of nearly all of their growth marketing strategies is the same: grow revenue. So, in order to do this, channel selection and tactics are primarily focused on driving customers to their websites who convert the most efficiently. That way, we’ll be able to scale their businesses and put marketing dollars towards the channels with the highest return. Winning.

While there are many metrics to keep track of and many ways to measure the success of revenue-driving campaigns, at Tuff, we cut through the noise and hone in on last-click attribution. This is the best way to quickly learn which channels are most effective and deserve the most attention from our paid ad budgets. 

9 times out of 10, last click is a great performance indicator for growing a brand, But what about the other 10% of the time? What’s the right strategic approach for eCommerce brands that have longer customer journeys? We most often see these longer journeys associated with luxury items that are higher priced—here, the customers spend more time in the consideration phase, making sure their decision to buy is right before they pay the high ticket price.

In those scenarios, we still keep last click as our preferred attribution model, but instead of locking in on just revenue as our main goal, we add leads into the equation as well.

Here’s how we do it: 

eCommerce Lead Generation: is it right for me?

For eCommerce lead generation to be a smart tactic for your brand to employ, you need a dedicated email marketing funnel—one that you’re managing relatively hands-on and improving on a regular basis. You also need some sort of sales strategy designed to convert your leads. You also need a way to qualify leads and have a measurable way to determine their value or potential value. Without these two mechanisms, lead generation will not work for your eCommerce brand. 

I have an eCommerce popup, does that count as lead generation?

To get super pointed with a definition: lead generation is defined as the initiation of consumer interest into products or services of a business. 

While eCommerce website popups are one proven way to grab website visitors’ emails in exchange for a free shipping or percentage offer discount, they can limit the consumer experience and hurt your perception (blame this on their overuse in the last decade). 

Our new favorite eCommerce Trend for lead generation is to develop a standout quiz or poll to capture contact information and provide you with the following: 

  • A way to prove your industry expertise.
  • A non-aggressive tactic to grab consumer insight.

Can you show me an example of an eCommerce Lead Generation Strategy?

Why yes, we can!

One of our partners, Canoe Club, is a high-end fashion retailer based in Boulder, CO. 

From a marketing standpoint their products differ from traditional eCommerce brands in two distinct ways: 

  1. Their inventory is ever-changing. Products from their brands are purchased in low quantities so what might be available one day won’t necessarily be available the next day.
  2. They’re a retail brand store, so they are selling other brands’ products. These products are on the higher end and have a higher barrier to entry. 

Due to these distinctions, Canoe Club’s customer lifetime value is higher than average, but finding individuals who meet their criteria doesn’t happen at a mass scale. 

Many people need time to find their Canoe Club fit and often times that won’t be on their first, second, or even third visit to the store. 

Additionally, even if Canoe Club has something a new visitor likes, they might not necessarily have it in their size. Their product lineup is based on buying seasons and quantities are limited per size. 

So instead of paying expensive costs to keep customers in an advertising funnel’s consideration phase, we worked with Canoe Club to develop a lead generation machine that captured leads at a high rate. We originally spotted this opportunity when we noticed the high traffic to email conversion rate

While we drove much of the strategy that laid the foundation for this successful tactic, we couldn’t have done it without the Canoe Club team. They developed a highly addicting, user-friendly quiz that drives prospective customers to sign up with their email. 

Appropriately called the Style Compass Quiz, this interactive quiz uses sophisticated TypeForm logic to assign users one of four style archetypes. 

We fell in love with the Style Compass Quiz the minute we laid eyes on it at Tuff. It’s far from stuffy and spammy, and is so unique that our Growth Marketer, Kristin said:

Slack message about Canoe Club quiz.

And she wasn’t wrong. On Instagram, Facebook, and even Reddit – the quiz has done insanely well at generating leads for Canoe Club. Here are our Campaign Results to date: 

Campaign Results 
Spend $3,191.43
Traffic 8,691
Emails 3,108
Cost Per Email $1.02
Traffic to Email CVR 39%

With this style quiz, we’ve been able to increase Canoe Club’s email list size significantly and provide a way for them to capture people in the awareness and consideration phase at a low cost. 

From here, Canoe Club can do what they do best, which is to provide their subscribers with email marketing updates on their ever-changing lineup of fits and seasonal brand drops.

And we can keep doing what we do best, driving qualified traffic from established and niche ad channels that take action. In this case, the action is subscribing with an email address.

We are currently using Facebook to hone in on luxury audiences that may not convert on the first few website visits, but are great consumers to have in an email marketing flow. 

The other channel we are using is Reddit. Often left out of most Growth Marketing Strategies, Reddit presents a unique opportunity for brands to leverage their extensive collection of niche communities on topics ranging from fashion and style to bitcoin to sports (to name a few). 

Reddit advertising allows you to get in front of these niche communities with an offer. In this case, it’s for our style compass quiz: 

Canoe Clube Reddit Ad

While generating revenue from Redditors isn’t the easiest, we’ve been fairly successful at generating email leads from these communities. 

To conclude, finding a piece of content, quiz, or poll that your potential customers can interact with and leave their contact information is a great way for you to grow your email list, prove your expertise in your industry, and learn about your consumer. 

Finding the right channels and audiences to market this to is the challenge, but when done correctly can diversify your business’s revenue streams and provide an opportunity for you to grow other parts of your business aside from daily revenue. For more eCommerce growth tips, head to our eCommerce Playlist

A clean desk with a fresh document up for writing a new blog

Powering eCommerce Growth With Content Marketing

A clean desk with a fresh document up for writing a new blog

When we hear from eCommerce companies how they are powering their growth traction with digital marketing, they usually reference their ads performance, how specific products are selling, or how their revenue growth looks from a year over year perspective. 

Rarely do they talk about their eCommerce growth in relation to their organic revenue and content marketing strategy

From our perspective, as an eCommerce growth agency, that should be the number one focus for every eCommerce marketing strategy: generating targeted performance content that search engines will slap on page one. This, most importantly, drives potential customers to your site. And as a bonus, it becomes fodder for sharing in your email newsletter, on social media, and more. 

What is Content Marketing?

“We have a blog!” is the answer we get when we ask brands about their eCommerce content marketing efforts. 

That’s all well and good, but what exactly is on your blog?

If it’s content written for a specific target audience that helps them solve a problem using focus keywords that will enable the search engines to rank you as an authority figure in your industry, then you’re on track. 

If it’s brand content about what your founder had breakfast then keep reading.  

Content marketing is an inbound marketing strategy that eCommerce companies (but really all companies no matter who you’re selling to) should leverage as their go-to lead generation strategy. That’s a bold statement for an agency that also has a robust and powerful team of paid acquisition experts. 

Used in tandem with search engine optimization (SEO), a strong content marketing strategy produces content (think product copy, written articles, infographics, how-to videos) based on keyword analysis and topics related to an eCommerce site’s industry. 

A content strategy agency like Tuff can help you do it, too. 

Why Content Marketing for eCommerce? 

The answer is simple: would you rather pay top dollar for every single keyword you want to rank for in the form of paid search placements or would you prefer to get top rankings for free? 

We’ll assume you went with the less costly approach. 

You may be familiar with content marketing from other industries outside of eCommerce like B2B and SaaS. They produce content like ebooks, white papers, and case studies that contain information that their audience finds useful based on their own unique industry perspective or product. 

eCommerce content strategies are no different, but instead of ebook and white papers, we’re all about helpful guides, how-to articles, and most importantly product pages stacked with content that’s highly optimized for search engines. 

A content marketing strategy for eCommerce enables you to show search engines and most importantly potential customers that you’re an expert on your industry. Just selling products within your industry space isn’t enough, you need to prove that your product or service is solving a problem by being the authority leader in your space. 

How to Create a Content Marketing Strategy for eCommerce

The good news: getting started growing your business with a content marketing strategy for your eCommerce business isn’t rocket science. But it does take some deliberate planning and focused research. 

First, you’ll want to put together a core list of target keywords you want to rank for. 

You might use words you’re bidding for on Google Search campaigns or do research using a search engine marketing tool to find non-branded organic keywords related to your eCommerce industry. 

These will be your focus keywords. As the name implies, you’ll build content around these keywords. For example, check out the focus keywords for this article: 

  • eCommerce content marketing
  • eCommerce growth
  • eCommerce growth marketing
  • content marketing

We’ve chosen them specifically because we know that there’s an opportunity for Tuff to improve our ranking on keywords related to eCommerce content marketing. And the higher we rank, the more people click through to our site. Although we’re not an eCommerce business, the principles hold true: more clicks = more revenue. (How meta is that?)

Once you’ve done your homework, you’ll want to figure out how to incorporate these keywords into a strategy. While there are a number of different ways to go about creating a content strategy, our favorite is the pillar strategy. This is where each keyword focus represents the foundation and you want to build articles off of your foundation to create a pillar. 

Putting These Focus Keywords to Work

Each focus keyword needs to have different types of content built on it. As mentioned, this could be a variety of content types. Consider everything from articles to infographics—this is where things can get tricky, it’s important to create content that is not just designed to attract the attention of search engines, but real humans looking for real answers to their questions. 

The good news: oftentimes many eCommerce brands already have a huge bank of content that they’ve built up over the years. So instead of starting from scratch, it’s possible to take stock of what you’ve already created and design a roadmap for combing through and strategically infusing targeted keywords. This can kickstart a performance content strategy without bucking up and going from 0-60 out the gate.

How to Optimize Your Product Copy with Focus Keywords

A great way to start using your focus keywords is to assign them to top selling products or your entire product catalog (depending on the number of products within your catalog). You will want each of your products to have keyword focus. 

Then using that keyword, it’s best practice to include it within the product title, product description, SEO title, meta description, and product URL. 

This will provide the foundation for your eCommerce content strategy. From here, you’ll want to produce content that features your focus keywords and links back to the foundation product pages that you assigned each specific keyword to. Simple!

Great eCommerce Content Marketing Examples 

Having trouble grasping what a eCommerce content strategy looks like in practice? Here are three examples to show you how it can be done: 

#1) REI.com 

A screenshot of the REI blog with the headline "Expert Advice"

Meet the little-known retailer called REI (kidding). They have a supercharged content strategy that enables them to pull in potential customers on just about any question someone might have about outdoor recreation products. 

Their blog strategy has morphed into what is more clearly defined as a knowledge base on all things recreation equipment—an incredible, powerful, and most notably profitable achievement.  

Strategically creating a knowledge base is becoming a more and more frequent play for eCommerce brands who want to organize their content in a way that enables them to help potential and existing customers on a range of topics. 

Instead of scrolling through endless pages of blog content, website visitors can easily search their knowledge base using a query-based search feature or by selecting topic categories. 

#2) Quietkat.com

A screen shot of the QuietKat blog

For a second selection, here’s a shameless plug for our client, QuietKat, an electric bike brand based out of Colorado. 

We’ve been working with them for the last year to define their SEO content strategy and product content that helps educate existing and potential customers. 

We won’t get too into the nitty gritty of how we do what we do with QuietKat, but take a drive through the QuietKat blog and check out how we’ve designed a content strategy to inform our existing and potential customers on all things electric bikes. 

#3) CulturesForHealth.com

A screenshot of the Cultures for Health blog

The final example of a content strategy from an eCommerce brand we really love is Cultures For Health. Similar to REI, their content is organized within a knowledge base learning center format which enables their website traffic to quickly access the information they need. They can also host multiple types of content together in an aesthetically pleasing fashion that doesn’t look cluttered. 

Their content marketing strategy has allowed them to lay off the paid search play and focus 100% on producing content that their audience loves. 

Here’s a break down of top keywords they rank for and how much organic traffic those keywords generate: 

  • Kombucha – ranking #13 (368,000 searches per month) 
  • Sourdough starter – ranking #16 (201,000 searches per month) 
  • Sauerkraut – ranking #4 (165,000 searches per month) 

Final Thoughts 

While an eCommerce content marketing strategy is not a quick fix, the benefits of a well thought out and executed SEO performance content strategy are huge.

Don’t be in a rush to start ranking on page one for your focus keywords. Rather, build out a strategy and look at from a quarterly growth timeline: where do you want to be ranking in three, six, nine, 12, and 15 months from now? How much content do you need to produce each month to hit your goals? 

Finally, don’t try to do it all yourself. You’ll need some help along the way.

Let a Content Strategy Agency like Tuff help you with the heavy lifting!  

top linkedin lead gen strategies

Top LinkedIn Lead Generation Strategies (+1 Bonus Lead Gen Experiment)

LinkedIn Lead Generation Strategies

As a business owner, chances are good that you have some type of familiarity with the LinkedIn platform. Maybe you’ve used the world’s most famous business networking website to meet more leaders and experts in your space, as a recruitment tool for finding top talent or to share a piece of content about your business. But what’s your record like with LinkedIn lead generation strategies? Have you dabbled with getting in front of your target audience through LinkedIn’s display advertising options, lead gen forms, or sponsored inmail? 

For those of you not fortunate enough to have applied a portion of your ad budget to LinkedIn, an assessment of the channel should be on your list. It provides you with a great way to get in front of your target audience to introduce your brand and generate quality leads.

However, it is important that you know a few things about LinkedIn Advertising before you start building campaigns and developing ads. One top of mind aspect of LinkedIn Advertising should be that it is not a cheap platform to use. The expensive aspect of LinkedIn ensures that not all your competitors will be using it for lead generation, but it also requires that you be very well positioned to on LinkedIn before you even start advertising. 

Is LinkedIn Lead Generation Right For Your Business? 

At Tuff, our clients have seen the most success with LinkedIn lead generation strategies when they’ve had three things nailed down. Here’s a step-by-step guide to determine whether this type of advertising channel makes sense for your business:

     1. Is LinkedIn Lead Generation right for you from a business model perspective? 

As mentioned, LinkedIn is expensive. Expect to see extremely high CPMs not to mention CPCs. Given the high barrier of entry for LinkedIn Advertising, you need to figure out if your business model is even right for LinkedIn. What space are you in? Our clients who see the most success with LinkedIn lead generation strategies are ones in the B2B space with multi-thousand dollar lifetime values from their customers. 

     2. Does your LinkedIn Business Page contain regularly posted organic content?

You can’t kick off a well-coordinated and strategic LinkedIn advertising campaign unless the lights are on in your LinkedIn Business Page. More than little signs of life, you need to have a big presence on your page to make sure your LinkedIn ads perform well. If you’re prospecting, users will want to learn more about you before they head to your website or fill out a lead form. 

Your organic LinkedIn posting strategy needs to involve information about your business, your current clients, and your culture. One agency that we think has done an exceptional job at their LinkedIn organic presence is Directive. Check out the video above to see their LinkedIn page and notice how much different content in various formats they have posted to their page!

    3. Do you already know your target audience? 

Knowing your audience is incredibly important on LinkedIn (as it is with other channels, but even more so with LinkedIn). With other advertising platforms like Google and Facebook, you can set up tests to figure out what the audience will respond best to your advertising. We highly recommend not doing this on LinkedIn, it’s not an audience research phase-type platform unless you can afford it. 

Given the cost, you’ll waste large amounts of money doing audience research on LinkedIn, which is why it’s so important that you know your audience before you start your LinkedIn strategy. 

A great example of this is from one of our clients, Thalamus, who is the premier GME interview management platform that connects residency and fellowship applicants and programs. 

Their target audience is residency coordinators or program directors at academic medical centers and hospital systems throughout the US & Canada, which is exactly who we targeted on LinkedIn. 

Strategy #1: Leverage Lookalike Audiences 

You might be familiar with Lookalike Audiences from running Facebook advertising campaigns. If not, there’s nothing complicated about understanding them. As the name implies, they are lookalikes of an existing customer audience that has already interacted with your business. 

For example, a common first Lookalike audience that we create for our clients is one based on your current customers. You can also create a Lookalike audience based on users who have taken a specific action on your site (tracked by the LinkedIn Insight Tag).

A great way to leverage this in a LinkedIn Campaign is to use a Lookalike as your base audience, then layer in other demographic or job-specific targeting options specific to your target audience. 

Strategy #2: Optimize for higher in the funnel

Another great LinkedIn lead generation strategy has to do with how you position LinkedIn in your overall advertising strategy. 

In a very, very rare circumstance will LinkedIn be a sustainable way for you to scale your business. What’s more likely is that LinkedIn Ads will provide your business with a method for introducing specific people to your business, piece of content, and if your budget allows you to drive them to your website. 

Since LinkedIn has a higher cost associated with running ads on it than other platforms, we suggest optimizing your ads for goals that are higher in the funnel and planning your advertising strategy accordingly for those higher objectives. 

For example, you might want to run an ad with a lead gen form that you optimize for engagement. You’re essentially telling LinkedIn that you want to get your ad in front of as many people as possible that will engage with your ad and will give those a way to get in touch with you with a CTA linking to a lead form should engagers want to learn more about your business. 

Experiment #1: Influencer marketing lead generation  

Finally, we’d like to suggest a theoretical lead generation experiment that we’ve been developing at Tuff for LinkedIn. In full transparency, we don’t have any evidence to support that this works, because we haven’t had a chance to try it out on any of our current campaigns. 

To start generating leads for your business without needing to allocate enough budget resources to a paid LinkedIn campaign, we recommend this strategy which utilizes Influencer Marketing

The first part of this strategy is to have one of your customers, a business acquaintance, or other business influencers make a written post on LinkedIn that advocates for your business – make sure the post doesn’t include any links because LinkedIn wants to keep their users on LinkedIn as much as possible so they keep posts with outbound links from getting as much organic traction as ones without links. 

The second part of this strategy is to then have other customers or influencers like and share the post with their network on LinkedIn. Eventually, you should be able to get a snowball effect going with your post to cause it to go viral. When done right this type of strategy should help you get in front of your target audience without needing to pay steep LinkedIn advertising costs. 

 

Data to measure your ecommerce conversion rate.

Pairing Market Boom With an eCommerce Growth Strategy

ebike in the snow

When we think about a brand as a good fit for us at Tuff, we look to their current traction and historical growth. How’s their momentum currently and how have they been growing?

Based on the answers to these questions, we then think through whether our team will be helpful to them. Will our strength in Growth strategy specifically around services like Social Advertising, PPC, and SEO be channels that we can drive significant growth month over month? 

In addition to larger growth marketing opportunities, we look to a brand’s success within their market as well as that market’s current growth. Is it an industry that is booming or stagnant? How does the brand’s offering work within that market and how is that market responding to them? 

We then seek to pair external market forces with a growth strategy.

A great example of how we paired market boom with an incredibly smart growth strategy is from our partnership with QuietKat. 

QuietKat is an electric bike retailer based out of Eagle, Colorado that sells direct-to-consumer, on Amazon, and through a network of large and mid-sized retailers including within the Cabelas and Bass Pro Shop network. 

Unlike many electric bike brands within the cycling industry, QuietKat’s primary audience is not your typical urban commuter. Instead for the last few years, they’ve been carving out a place for themselves with a hunting and outdoorsmen space. 

Turns out that electric bikes, in addition to hauling groceries and kids in an urban environment, are also ideal for backcountry hunting when outfitted with fat tire mountain bike tires and accessories. 

Electric bikes are specifically good for hunters due to their quiet and stealthy approach (hence the name QuietKat) combined with new battery efficiency that gives riders the ability to go further for longer. 

QuietKat came to Tuff to talk about growth in March 2020. Their success in the hunting space had propelled them to seek new audience growth within the Outdoor space.

As mentioned, before we bring on new partners, we do our research to make sure that specific clients are a good fit for Tuff. QuietKat was no different, we did our homework and spent time pouring over historical data, Electric Bike Industry insights, and projections for where the market was headed.  

From our research, we found numerous opportunities for growth within QuietKat’s offering that would pair perfectly with Tuff’s Growth expertise. In addition, we learned that the E-Bike Market was in the midst of a Market BOOM. In short, while e-bikes had taken years to gain popularity outside of niche customer markets specifically for environmentally conscious buyers, the market had shifted sometime in the late 2010s and the mass opinion had decided that electric bikes were ‘in’ and were buying them quicker than brands could build them. 

For example, during our research, we found that Rad Power Bikes, an urban commuter electric bike industry leader from Seattle, had one of their largest revenue-generating years in 2019 with over $100M in electric bikes and accessories sold. In 2020, following their successes in 2019, they’ve seen 300% revenue growth month over month. 

Due to a pairing of market boom with growth strategy, QuietKat has also seen significant growth in 2020. Here’s how we were able to yield results with our growth strategy attached to a growing market. 

We Made Our eCommerce SEO Strategy a Top Priority

We often find that organic is overlooked as a channel. Strategies for growing organic often get put somewhere at the bottom of the marketing strategy and harped on the least. 

Don’t get us wrong, paid advertising is very exciting but in our opinion, brands with organic revenue making up the largest chunk of their overall revenue stand to do the best in the long run. 

The simple fact is that it’s incredibly difficult as a brand to subsist on just paid growth. Typically, you need a pipeline of investment to help pay for that growth when costs increase or you need to scale. 

With a strong organic revenue-producing strategy, you can build your own investment pipeline for the days when cost is high or turning up the scale is prime time. 

But doesn’t an eCommerce SEO Strategy take years to actually start working? 

organic growth from Google Analytics

Yes, it takes time (so does growing a brand), but you can start seeing results in 90-days or less should you know how to build on organic momentum through a tactic called SEO (Search Engine Optimization). 

One of Tuff Growth’s Channel Expertise is SEO, we even have a dedicated channel expert who heads up SEO strategy for our clients. 

For QuietKat, we found that in 2019 Organic Traffic made up 40% of eCommerce revenue, the highest revenue-generating channel with the highest conversion rate in our analysis.

By making Organic Growth a priority we’ve been able to grow that channel. Currently organic makes up 60% of revenue for QuietKat. 

We were able to grow organic with three main SEO tactic improvements. 

Dashboard example from SEM Rush

1. Improving Site Health + Speed

When we first start working on improving the organic performance for our clients, we typically run an SEO Audit to determine whether we can start implementing organic revenue-driving strategies that will work with the current infrastructure. Two primary data points we look to when making this assessment are Site Health and Site speed. 

Site health is based on the number of total errors and total warnings that are found on the pages crawled on your site. We typically feel comfortable implementing revenue-driving strategies when websites have a 90% or better score. 

Another check we do is on site speed. We find that website’s with slower speeds perform at lower rates than ones with faster speeds. This impacts how organic traffic will perform on your website. We can spend lots of time developing revenue driving organic strategies but if the website infrastructure they land on isn’t ready to handle their needs then performance will suffer. 

2. Improving Internal Linking 

Once we’ve improved site health and speed, then we seek to improve the internal linking on your website. For QuietKat we made sure that every single page on their website linked to other content in a parent / child like structure. 

We specifically worked on making sure that there were no dead-ends for the user and that the user always had a place to go that we wanted to rank. For example, they might start on a blog post and end on a landing page, because we had included a link to a collection page within the blog post that then pushed the user to checkout a product page. 

3. Improving Product Optimization

Once we had improved internal linking for QuietKat then we worked on product optimization, which involves one of the most effective tasks you can do in eCommerce SEO – optimized product titles. 

Product titles need to have clear and searchable titles that Google can easily index and rank. When titles are optimized, it’s more likely that user queries will trigger your organic content to be shown on search engine results. 

In addition, we also optimize product descriptions, which helps with driving more organic traffic because there’s more content on the page to rank. High quality content in your product description will work in combination with your product title to help you show up higher in search results. 

Developed a Strong PPC Strategy That Plays Nice With Social & Organic 

Example of an eCommerce search ad on Google.

PPC is one our favorite tactics at Tuff. It works really well by itself and can help bring websites extremely qualified traffic due to the fact that when done correctly brings in people already in the discovery phase of what you’re offering. 

It’s also our favorite because it can work really well with social and organic. 

One big issue that is often overlooked when thinking about Growth is how paid tactics work together individually and with organic. My hunch is that this is due to paid tactics usually being performance based. At Tuff we use performance data strategies to inform us on how tactics are working – a very common perspective to use in marketing. 

Where we separate ourselves at Tuff is how we isolate those tactics’ performance and consider how those tactics are working with one another to advertise as a funnel. How are the paid tactics working in combination with a strong organic strategy? How are we informing users on a more impression-based model to consider our brand down the line? 

Just looking at who saw our ads, clicked, and immediately converted is a poor way to judge an overall Growth Marketing Strategy, but it’s also a great way to determine if a particular ad campaign is performing at a high enough rate to warrant increased spend. 

The secret is to utilize a balanced full-funnel approach to decide what channels serve as awareness or reminders and what channels attribute to the last click sale.  

Understanding Audience Has Never Been More Important

Like many marketing strategies, audience understanding is key to success. For QuietKat, we spent a lot of time on both social and PPC refining our audiences. One of QuietKat’s objectives for us was to find new audiences outside of the hunting space. To do this, we worked off of hunters and found subsets of Outdoorsmen closely aligned with their primary audience that existed outside of the immediate audience. 

To do this though, we tested the same creatives across platforms like Youtube, Google Display Network (GDN), Facebook, and Instagram. 

We quickly learned that these top of the funnel placements would not yield immediate results and that we would need to look to longer conversion paths with multiple touchpoints. 

We found that on average it took 7 touchpoints in a sequence to yield a conversion, but on the extremes, we saw 13 touchpoint highs and 1 touchpoint lows. 

Understanding Multi-Channel Sales Paths

Example of mult-touch attribution for eCommerce.

For QuietKat, our analysis found that due to the cost range of an electric bike by QuietKat ($2500 – $6500), we weren’t going to find one advertising channel that would definitively carry our sales. For higher priced items this is generally the case since the decision stage is inherently longer. 

As explained above, we found on average that conversion required 7 touch points. This meant that customers were coming through to convert on a longer sequence that included our multiple channels from social to ppc to organic to direct. 

For less expensive priced items, we might find that a single channel or two channels play a central role in assisting a conversion. For more expensive items, we’ve found that the buyer’s journey is longer and requires more touch points.  

Having an independent strategy for each channel that worked together underneath our larger growth marketing strategy allowed us to increase overall eCommerce revenue by 88% since our partnership began in April 2020.

Focusing on eCommerce Conversion Rate Optimization

Example of an eCommerce website.

The final tactic that contributed to our partnership success has been a keen focus on eCommerce Website Conversion Rate Optimization (CRO). It’s such an important factor of a successful growth strategy, because you could have the best ad creative and copy, but without a solid conversion rate – your ads might never get the conversion they deserve. 

One area of focus that applied to our overall eCommerce Converison rate was improving onsite navigation by developing a data-driven layout combined with our expertise for eCommerce to build a smart navigation header bar. 

Our strategy helped increase eCommerce Conversion Rate by 26%, which led to over 100% increases in Revenue and Transactions. 

Stats on an increase in online CVR.
Essentially, we were able to get more people to purchase by simply making it easier for them to find what they were looking to purchase. 

By focusing on eCommerce Website CRO, we were also able to increase revenue without needing to increase ad spend budget or traffic. 

MoM data results for online store.

This is possible because eCommerce CVR is directly tied to eCommerce Revenue. When eCommerce CVR goes up, revenue and transactions go up. See the chart above for reference. When we increase the eCommerce CVR to .5%, we see a direct increase in Transactions and Revenue without needing more traffic or an increase in average order value. Growth Marketing Strategy

Each Growth Marketing Strategy looks different for each brand we work with at Tuff. Not all the channels featured in this case study may work for any other brand. Let us take a deep dive into your brand and develop a strategy built for your business. 

Download a Sample Growth Marketing Proposal

working on laptop

3 Influencer Marketing Tools to Find Brand Ambassadors

person at laptop

As we’ve previously discussed in our Influencer Playlist, Finding The Right Brand Ambassador is not an afternoon task that will quickly yield high returns. Influencer Marketing and Brand Ambassador Programs take time to develop and rarely produce massive returns. You will need to define your campaign strategy and goals, assemble a dedicated team, and execute precisely. 

In addition, you’ll need to find a compensation model that works for your strategy and type of Brand Ambassador. 

By far the trickiest part of the building a manageable Brand Ambassador program will be finding the right influencers to work with your brand.

Not all influencers will be a perfect fit for your brand and not all brand ambassadors are easy to work alongside. Be prepared to work with individuals who may or may not have experience working with brands. 

This stage of the process will be the most time consuming and might be the most difficult. To help make finding the right brand ambassador more streamlined, we recommend using a software tool dedicated to helping you find influencers based on specific search filters and parameters. 

At a basic level, these tools provide you with a way to build a query to find influencers that match your parameters. There are free tools that allow you to do this at a more broad level and with some of the higher-end tools you can cater your searches to be extremely granular. 

Here are some of your options for Brand Ambassador and Influencer Marketing Tools that we recommend. We break them out based on three categories – Free, Tools Under $100 Per Month, Enterprise Tools. 

Free Brand Ambassador Search Tool

Influence.co

 

influence.co

Influence.co is a great tool for young brands looking to try out Influencer Branding without much investment. It provides you with basic search parameters, influencer messaging, and a large database of influencers. 

Keep in mind that it is a very popular free tool so many of the influencers you will be contacting have been reached out to by other brands in the past. Try to stay away from brand ambassadors who already have other contracts with brands or post about products / services too frequently. It’s likely that their audience won’t engage with content as much as with an influencer’s content that doesn’t show as much advertising.

Best Tool Under $50 For Brand Ambassador Search

Heepsy

Heepsy

Heepsy is our pick for the best tool under $50 for Brand Ambassador Search.  Like Influencer.Co, heepsy has granular query parameters that make it easy to find the right influencer based on your goals. It’s a bit more robust than Influencer.co and it has a more curated database of influencers. 

You have the option to build influencer reports which allows you to export influencer lists in bulk something that you can’t do with Influencer.co. 

The biggest con and one that you’ll find across the board with influencer marketing tools is that most of the influencers have been contacted by numerous brands so it’s important to do your homework and find ones that don’t have current contracts with brands or don’t post all the time about brands they work on. 

Best Enterprise Tool For Influencer Marketing

Upfluence

Upfluence

The final tool and our best tool for enterprise is upfluence. They are one of the top influencer marketing tools and have robust features like an influencer marketing CRM, campaign management, and analysis tools that are superior to the competition. 

 

person at laptop

7 Well-Designed Landing Page Examples

person at laptop

Well designed landing pages are no easy feat, but much easier to make happen and do well than 10-years ago. With a whole host of tools and content for landing pages at your disposal, developing one for your business has never been easier. 

Before you dive into your first landing page, we recommend doing your research and learning the process of how to write, build, and test landing pages.  Despite the easy accessibility to tools for building landing pages, it is still possible to build a bad landing page. 

In light of this, here are 7 of the best-designed landing page examples for you to hone your skills on. 

1. HelloFresh 

hello fresh

Ever had a HelloFresh box show up out of the blue with really no recollection of how it could possibly have your name on it or be at your front door? 

That’s because their landing pages are so dang cute from a design perspective and genius from a landing page strategy, that you barely realized you had signed up for more than one delivery. 

We’re not saying that HelloFresh tricks people or anything – we’re all aware of what we’ve done, but the landing page process can be so seamless and the offer can be so good that it’s hard to realize what you’ve done. 

That is until you’re standing there with a sack full of new groceries on a Monday staring dumbfounded at the HelloFresh box at your doorstep because you totally forgot it was HelloFresh week and you actually didn’t need to buy groceries. 

That’s the power of a well-designed landing page. 

2. Winc Wine Club

Winc Wine Club

 

Similar to HelloFresh, ever had a box of wine show up at your house that you totally forgot about because again, signing up was so easy that you barely realized what you were doing until you did it, then forgot about it, then found it delivered at your house? 

That’s the power of a well-designed landing page – all the elements come together that it doesn’t even feel like shopping anymore – it feels like… well magic! 

3. Yeti Coolers

Yeti Coolers

Then there are landing pages that are just seriously thought-through, beautifully crafted eCommerce collection pages in disguise. 

Take this Yeti Collection page for their Tundra Yeti Coolers for example. The difference between this one and every single other product collection page you’ve ever seen is that lifestyle image right smack in the middle of the page. 

Set there on the page like that to give you some perspective on what one of Yeti’s coolers looks like out in the wild. As you can see, it looks pretty god damn tough – like their messaging points out. 

And right there on that page, you get why there’s thousands of reviews for what you might have thought was an overpriced insulated box. 

That’s the power of a well-designed landing page. 

4. Monday.com

Monday

Great copy, perfectly styled creative, and well placed CTA can go a long way! 

But not as far as it can go when it’s positioned perfectly between a conversion and an aligning search ad. I triggered this landing page off of searching for “Scrum Board Software.” 

Knowing that my intent was based on managing team tasks, Monday.com came to my rescue and made me feel like they had just the solution I needed for my search. 

That’s the power of a well-designed landing page. 

5. Zapier

Zapier

The reason all of these landing pages are so impressive is partly due to the fact that they are all built around search ads triggered by specific phrases. 

When done right, search advertising paired with a supporting landing page that is dialed to the query is the perfect example of an optimized customer journey.

What I love about this hero copy is that it provides the user with three CTAs:

  • The demo is a bit less aggressive than the trial
  • The trial still being front and center
  • And then that bold small offer looking for the 0.01% who are also looking for an offer to pull the trigger on. 

That’s the power of a well-designed landing page. 

6. Allbirds 

Allbirds

Other times, you end up somewhere you didn’t really intend to be. 

You were searching running shoes and thinking you would end up with some Adidas or Nike ads, instead you get an allbirds ad and think, “allbirds? Is making performance running shoes now? I should probably check this out – just for fun of course.” 

And you get there and it’s as if allbirds is saying, “Hell yeah we’re making running shoes, come check them out, you won’t be disappointed!” 

And you’re so drawn in by the hero video of people running on the beach in what you guess are allbirds, that you have to keep scrolling, and then all of the sudden… you have allbirds on the way to your apartment. 

That’s the power of well-designed landing pages. 

7. Shopify

Shopify

And then there are those familiar ones – the ones you use every day, the Shopifys of the world. 

You run a search just to see if there’s anything else out there. 

A dumb search like, “Sell goods.” You think,  maybe… something… anything else has come up that might dwarf Shopify in comparison. 

First, search result, it’s Shopify. Well of course it’s shopify, you think. You click it – what the hell? 

You don’t need to be sold on Shopify, but you see the landing page and know you’re still in good hands. 

That’s the power of a well-designed landing page.